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Campbell, Thomas (01 February 1763–04 January 1854), one of the early leaders of the Restoration movement in American Protestantism, was born in County Down, Ireland, the son of Archibald Campbell, a soldier, and Alice McNally. Little is known about Campbell’s early life, but from a young age he was pious and studious. His father had converted from Roman Catholicism to Anglicanism, but Thomas joined the Seceder branch of the Presbyterian church as a young man. After teaching Latin and Greek near his home town, Thomas was allowed to attend the University of Glasgow, where he studied for the Presbyterian ministry. Following the normal three-year theological program, he received special training provided by the Antiburgher faction of the Seceder Presbyterian church. When his formal education was completed, he returned to Ireland, where he taught at Ballymena in County Antrim. There he married Jane Corneigle, probably in 1787. They had ten children, two of whom died in infancy. In 1798 he accepted the pastorate of Ahorey Church and also began an academy at Rich Hill....

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Dowie, John Alexander (25 May 1847–09 March 1907), religious sectarian, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of John Murray Dowie, a tailor and lay preacher, and Ann Macfarlane-McHardie. Early years in the family were marked by poverty, piety, and illness. A move to Australia in 1860 alleviated conditions somewhat, and young Dowie became successful in the dry goods business. In 1868, however, he decided to enter the ministry and studied at the University of Edinburgh for two years. Upon returning to Australia he was ordained minister of the Congregational church in Alma in May 1870. In 1876 he married Jane Dowie, a cousin whose family was initially quite opposed to the union; they had two children. Over the next few years Dowie held pastorates in Sydney and one of its suburbs, Newtown. However, in 1878 he decided that it was wrong for ministers to be salaried, and so he turned to independent evangelistic work. This proved to be so successful that he was soon able to build a large nondenominational tabernacle in Melbourne....