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Bond, William Cranch (09 September 1789–29 January 1859), clockmaker and astronomer, was born in Falmouth (now Portland), Maine, the son of Cornish immigrant William Bond, a silversmith and watchmaker, and Hannah Cranch. The elder Bond began a lumber business in Falmouth in 1786. Four years later, when a ship carrying the entire season’s cuttings went down and ruined the business, Bond moved his penniless family to Boston. In 1793 he set up a watch and jewelry business on Marlboro Street, which continued until 1977 as the firm of William Bond & Son....

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Bulova, Arde (24 October 1889–19 March 1958), businessman, was born in New York City, the son of Joseph Bulova and Bertha Eisner. His father emigrated to New York from Bohemia and in 1873 started a small jewelry manufacturing business that eventually became the Bulova Watch Company. Bulova attended school in New York and in 1905 began working as a salesman for his father’s company. The family business prospered and in 1911 was incorporated, with the father as president and the son as vice president and treasurer. The firm was reincorporated in 1923 as the Bulova Watch Company, Inc. Bulova became chairman of the board in 1930, a position he held until his death in 1958....

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Crosby, Sylvester Sage (02 September 1831–18 August 1914), watchmaker and numismatist, was born in Charlestown, New Hampshire, the son of Jaazaniah Crosby, a Unitarian minister, and Holdah Robinson Sage. At the age of seventeen Crosby established a watchmaking business in Charlestown, New Hampshire. To be with other family members, he later moved to Boston, where he opened a watchmaking business. In 1855 he married Mary Elizabeth Capelle of Lexington, Massachusetts; she died in 1874, and the next year he married Mehitabel “Hittie” Ackers. Crosby had no children....

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Thomas, Seth (19 August 1785–29 January 1859), clock manufacturer, was born in Wolcott, Connecticut, the son of James Thomas, an immigrant from Scotland, and Martha Barnes. Little is known of Thomas’s early life. He appears to have received a very limited education, but that was not unusual in late eighteenth-century Connecticut. He was apprenticed as a carpenter and joiner; following the apprenticeship he became a full-fledged cabinetmaker and worked for several years building houses and barns in the general vicinity of his home. It is believed that he also worked for some time on the construction of Long Wharf in New Haven. Up to the age of twenty-two, there was nothing to differentiate Thomas from any number of laborers in the region of southern New England; what changed the course of his life and career was his association with Eli Terry....