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Hering, Constantinelocked

(01 January 1800–23 July 1880)
  • Julian Winston

Extract

Hering, Constantine (01 January 1800–23 July 1880), homeopathic physician and educator, was born in Oschatz, Saxony, the son of Christian Gottlieb Karl Hering, a school headmaster and church organist, and Christiane Friedericke Kreutzberg. After receiving “classical schooling” in Zittau, Saxony, he began studying medicine in Dresden in 1817. While taking courses in medicine at the University of Leipzig in 1820, he was asked by his teacher to write a paper denouncing homeopathic medicine (a system of therapeutics developed by Samuel Hahnemann, based on the principle that a substance that is capable of causing symptoms in a healthy person is capable of curing similar symptoms when they occur as a part of a natural illness). Hering investigated the system and became convinced of its efficacy. He transferred to the University of Wurzburg and received his medical degree in 1826. Hering worked for a short time as a teacher of mathematics and natural sciences in Dresden. An avid naturalist and botanist, he was commissioned as a naturalist by the king of Saxony and was sent to Surinam to collect specimens. After contributing articles to several homeopathic journals in Europe, Hering was asked by the king to cease his involvement in medicine while in Surinam. In response to this request, Hering resigned his commission and stayed on to practice medicine. He remained in Surinam until 1833, at which time he was invited to join a colleague in the United States and settled in Philadelphia....

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