1-20 of 302 results  for:

  • Writing and publishing x
Clear all

Article

Abbey, Edward (29 January 1927–14 March 1989), essayist, novelist, and radical ecologist, was born in Home, Pennsylvania, the son of Paul Revere Abbey, a farmer, and Mildred Postlewaite, a public schoolteacher. He was raised, with four siblings, on a hardscrabble farm. A turning point in late adolescence came out of some months of hitchhiking around the western United States, with which he ever after fervently identified himself....

Article

Adams, Henry (16 February 1838–27 March 1918), historian, novelist, and critic, was born Henry Brooks Adams in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Charles Francis Adams, a diplomat, legislator, and writer, and Abigail Brooks. He enjoyed unparalleled advantages, chief among them his famous name and many family connections: he was the great-grandson of President ...

Article

Allen, Henry Wilson, Jr. (29 September 1912–26 October 1991), novelist and short-story writer, was born in Kansas City, Missouri, the son of Henry Wilson Allen, Sr., a dentist and oral surgeon, and Ella Jensen, a portrait painter. Allen’s father, descended from the American revolutionary war hero ...

Article

Andrews, Mary Raymond Shipman (02 April 1860–02 August 1936), novelist and short story writer, was born in Mobile, Alabama, the daughter of the Right Reverend Jacob Shaw Shipman, an Episcopal minister, and Anna Louise Johns. In 1861 the family moved to Lexington, Kentucky, where she learned to appreciate outdoor activities, particularly riding. Mary’s father later served as bishop in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, and then at Christ Church in New York City, where the family settled in 1877. After graduating from high school, Mary studied with her father and later with her husband, William Shankland Andrews, an attorney whom she married in 1884. They had one child....

Article

Andrews, V. C. (06 June 1923?–19 December 1986), novelist, was born Virginia Cleo Andrews in Portsmouth, Virginia, the daughter of William Henry Andrews, a retired serviceman who owned a tool-and-die business, and Lillian Lilnora Parker, a telephone operator. Little is known about her personal life, and she sought to keep her exact age a secret. Andrews spent her childhood in Portsmouth and later in Rochester, New York. She was a gifted artist from an early age, and her talents were encouraged. Andrews also expressed a great desire to act. By her own account, she lived a life of the imagination, reading a great deal (Alexander Dumas and ...

Article

Appel, Benjamin (13 September 1907–03 April 1977), novelist and short story writer, was born in New York City, the son of Louis Appel, a successful real estate businessman, and Bessie Mikofsky, both Polish émigrés from once-wealthy families. He grew up in a largely immigrant section of Hell’s Kitchen on the West Side of Manhattan, and his parents did their best to shield their son from the deprivation and periodic violence that often plagued their neighborhood. Such concerns form much of the substance of Appel’s early novels....

Article

Ardrey, Robert (16 October 1908–14 January 1980), anthropologist, playwright, and novelist, was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Robert Lesley Ardrey, an editor and publisher, and Marie Haswell. Ardrey earned a Ph.D. in the natural and social sciences from the University of Chicago in 1930. After taking a writing course taught by ...

Article

Arenas, Reinaldo (16 July 1943–07 December 1990), novelist and political activist, was born in Holguín, a town in rural eastern Cuba, the son of Oneida Fuentes, a poor peasant woman, and a peasant father who abandoned his unborn child. Barely sixteen years old at the time of the Cuban Revolution, Arenas received excellent instruction during the Campaigns against Illiteracy conducted by volunteers sympathetic to Fidel Castro’s ideals. Such an opportunity for self-improvement was unheard of during the regime of the deposed leader, Fulgencio Batista. In 1960 Arenas received a scholarship so that he might pursue a career in accounting in Havana....

Article

Arthur, Timothy Shay (06 June 1809–06 March 1885), editor, temperance crusader, and novelist, was born in Orange County, New York, the son of William Arthur and Anna Shay, occupations unknown. He was named for his maternal grandfather, Timothy Shay, an officer in the revolutionary war. By his mid-twenties, Arthur had yet to identify a profession or receive an education. In the 1830s, however, he began an intense program of self-education as well as a writing career as a journalist in Baltimore, where he quickly became a well-known and articulate champion of numerous social causes including temperance, Swedenborgianism, feminism, and socialism. In 1836 he married Eliza Alden; they had seven children....

Article

Asch, Nathan (10 July 1902–23 December 1964), novelist, was born in Warsaw, Poland, the son of Sholem Asch, a well-known Yiddish writer, and Mathilda Spira. The Asch family moved from Warsaw to Paris in 1912 and then to Switzerland at the outbreak of World War I. They settled permanently in the United States, on Staten Island, in 1915. Asch completed public schooling in Brooklyn, New York, and then attended Syracuse and Columbia universities. He never received a degree, deciding instead to leave school and to devote his energies to learning the craft of writing....

Image

Sholem Asch. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-112710).

Article

Asch, Sholem (01 November 1880–10 July 1957), Yiddish novelist, dramatist, and short story writer, was born in Kutno, Poland, a small town near Warsaw, the son of Moishe Asch, a cattle dealer and innkeeper, and Malka Wydawski. Asch was raised in a small town and was essentially self-educated. His father taught him the alphabet from the Bible, which was, as Asch later noted, “the first book that I ever held in my hand” (Siegel, p. 3). The Bible served as his grammar, geography, and history textbooks, as well as a storybook of sorts; later the Scriptures became a source of continual literary inspiration. As an adult Asch became a serious collector of rare biblical editions. He attended local schools to train for the rabbinate, studying the Talmud but also reading German classics and Shakespeare. Finally, against his family’s wishes, Asch made up his mind to become a writer....

Article

Austin, Jane Goodwin (25 February 1831–30 March 1894), historical novelist and juvenile writer, was born Mary Jane Goodwin in Worcester, Massachusetts, the daughter of Isaac Goodwin, a lawyer, antiquarian, and authority on Pilgrim history, and Elizabeth Hammatt, a poet and songwriter. After her father’s death in 1832, the family moved to Boston, where Jane was educated in private schools. As a young girl she began to cultivate her lifelong interest in family genealogy and her Pilgrim ancestors, writing stories about their lives for her own and her family’s amusement. Some of these stories were eventually published under various pen names in contemporary periodicals. Her brother, the Honorable John Abbot Goodwin, was also inspired by their heritage and wrote a history of Plymouth settlement, ...

Article

Bacheller, Irving (26 September 1859–24 February 1950), novelist and publishing executive, was born Addison Irving Bacheller in Pierrepont, St. Lawrence County, New York, the son of Sanford Paul Bacheller and Achsah Ann Buckland, farmers. Irving attended local schools in Pierrepont, then switched to an academy in Canton, New York, after his family moved there. His secondary education at Clinton Academy was sporadic, however, as he spent long periods during his teenage years working at various jobs—telegraph operator, laborer, post office clerk, bookkeeper, salesman, teacher—to help support the family....

Article

Bailey, Temple (1880?–06 July 1953), novelist and short story writer, was born Irene Temple Bailey in Petersburg, Virginia, the daughter of Milo Varnum Bailey and Emma Sprague. Her birth date is uncertain, but when she died she was thought to be in her seventies. The Baileys lived for a time in Richmond, Virginia, before moving to Washington, D.C., when Temple was five. She returned briefly to Richmond, where she attended a girls’ school housed in what had been General ...

Article

Baker, Dorothy Dodds (21 April 1907–17 June 1968), novelist, was born in Missoula, Montana, the daughter of Raymond Branson Dodds, a businessman, and Alice Grady. Dorothy spent much of her childhood years in California, where her father worked in the oil business. She was educated at Occidental College, Whittier College, and the University of California at Los Angeles, where she received a B.A. in French in 1929, whereupon she traveled to Paris. Her travels introduced her to Howard Baker, whom she married in 1930; they had two children. At this time she also began work on a novel that with considerable addition and revision would be published some ten years later in 1943 as her second book, ...

Article

Elaine Fredericksen

Baldwin, Faith (01 October 1893–19 March 1978), novelist, was born in New Rochelle, New York, the daughter of Stephen Charles Baldwin, a well-known trial lawyer, and Edith Hervey Finch. At age three she moved to Manhattan and then, at seven, to Brooklyn Heights. Baldwin was able to read by the time she was three years old. She attended Brooklyn Heights Academy and finishing school in Brooklyn and in Briarcliff Manor, New York. At six she wrote a drama called ...

Article

Basso, Hamilton (05 September 1904–13 May 1964), novelist, was born Joseph Hamilton Basso in New Orleans, the son of Dominick Basso, owner of a small shoe factory, and Louise Calamari, both of Italian descent. Growing up in New Orleans, Basso attended Colton Grammar School and Easton High School. In 1922 he entered Tulane University to study law. Finding himself more interested in history and literature than law, he became friends with a number of writers and intellectuals associated with the literary periodical the ...

Article

Beach, Rex (01 September 1877–07 December 1949), novelist and scenarist, was born Rex Ellingwood Beach in Atwood, Michigan, the son of Henry Walter Beach, a fruit farmer, and Eva Eunice Canfield, a former schoolteacher. When Beach was nine years old, he and his two older brothers accompanied their parents when they left their ill-paying farm and sailed with two neighboring families on a schooner to Chicago, into and down the Illinois River, to the Mississippi River, and on to Tampa, Florida, where they homesteaded on a farm. Beach attended the preparatory department of Rollins College, at Winter Park, Florida, beginning in 1891, then Rollins College, where he earned his tuition money by managing a laundry. He studied well, played intercollegiate baseball, and edited and managed the school literary magazine. In 1896 he left school short of graduating. Joining his brothers, both lawyers in Chicago, he performed odd jobs for them and studied at the Chicago College of Law. He played football and water polo on teams sponsored by the Chicago Athletic Association—mainly to eat at its training table. He was 6′ 1″, weighed just over 200 pounds, and had a correspondingly large appetite....

Image

Edward Bellamy Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-42652).