1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • territorial delegate x
Clear all

Article

Clark, Daniel (1766–13 August 1813), merchant, diplomat, and territorial delegate, was born in Sligo, Ireland. Although his parents’ names are unknown, his family’s wealth and connections were sufficient to provide him with an education at Eton and other English schools. Declining fortunes in Ireland prompted the Clarks in 1785 or 1786 to emigrate to America, where they settled in Germantown, outside of Philadelphia....

Image

Kuhio. Gelatin silver print, c. 1902, by James J. Williams. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum.

Article

Kuhio (26 March 1871–07 January 1922), prince of Hawaii and the islands' second territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress, prince of Hawaii and the islands’ second territorial delegate to the U.S. Congress, was born Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Piikoi at Kola, Kauai, to Princess Kekaulike Kinoike II and high chief David Kahalepouli Piikoi. His mother was related to the ancient kings of Maui and Hawaii, and her grandfather was King Kaumualii of Kauai....

Article

Poindexter, George (1779–05 September 1853), representative, governor of Mississippi, and U.S. senator, was born in Louisa County, Virginia, the son of Thomas Poindexter, a Baptist preacher, and Lucy Jones. After some schooling by his elder brother, Poindexter was admitted to the bar in Virginia. He practiced there briefly before moving to the Natchez district, Mississippi Territory, in 1802. In 1803 territorial governor ...

Article

Pope, Nathaniel (05 January 1784–23 January 1850), secretary of the Illinois Territory, delegate to the U.S. Congress, and federal judge, was born in Louisville, Kentucky, the son of William Pope and Penelope Edwards, a comfortable agrarian family. Details of Pope’s education are sketchy. He received private schooling as a youth and for a time attended Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky, although he did not graduate. Subsequently, he read law in the office of his older brother, John Pope, a future U.S. senator from Kentucky....

Article

Poydras, Julien (03 April 1746–23 June 1824), philanthropist and legislator, was born in Brittany, France, at Rezé, near Nantes, the son of François Poydras and Magdeleine Simon. (Following the custom of Louisiana after the Purchase, Poydras did not use the patronymic “de Lalande,” which otherwise would have appeared as an extension of his surname.) Little is known of his early life. He arrived in New Orleans around 1768, by tradition having served briefly in the French navy and been held prisoner by the British before escaping to Santo Domingo in 1760. Beginning his business career as a peddler up and down the Mississippi valley, Poydras soon established his primary base in Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana, just south of where the Red River empties into the Mississippi. From this site he expanded his commercial activities into the interior as far as Texas. He eventually became one of the largest proprietors in the Spanish colony, also acquiring extensive properties in and around New Orleans, particularly in the suburb just upriver from the original town, which quickly developed into the principal area of the city’s commercial activity after the Louisiana Purchase....

Article

Rice, Henry Mower (29 November 1816–15 January 1894), Indian trader and commissioner, Minnesota territorial delegate, and U.S. senator, was born in Waitsfield, Vermont, the son of Edmund Rice and Ellen Durkee. After his father died in 1828, Rice lived with the family of Justus Burdick. He completed an academy education and studied law in Rutland, Vermont, before moving to Michigan with the Burdick family in 1835. He worked as a chainman in the surveying of the Sault Ste. Marie Canal and for Kalamazoo merchants until 1839. That year he traveled to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was hired by Kenneth MacKenzie, a prominent commission and forwarding merchant and fur trader, who sent him to Fort Snelling, in present-day Minnesota, to assist the post sutler. The next year he was appointed sutler at the newly created Fort Atkinson near the Winnebago reservation in northeastern Iowa. In 1842 he moved to Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, to join Hercules L. Dousman, a longtime partner in the Western Outfit of the American Fur Company, in trade with the Winnebago and Ojibwa of the upper Mississippi region. Five years later he was sent to Mendota near Fort Snelling as an agent of Pierre Chouteau, Jr. and Company (see ...

Article

Sibley, Henry Hastings (20 February 1811–18 February 1891), soldier, congressman, and governor, was born in Detroit, Michigan Territory, the son of Solomon Sibley, a territorial delegate to Congress and justice of the Michigan Supreme Court, and Sarah Sproat. Educated at a local academy, he also received two years of tutoring in the classics. In his late teens Sibley studied law, but in 1828 he began to clerk for an army sutler and the following year for the American Fur Company. In 1834, by which time he had become the company’s chief factor on the upper Mississippi, Sibley entered into a partnership with two veteran fur traders. Together, they operated trading stations at Mackinac, Michigan Territory, and Fort Snelling, Minnesota Territory....