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Caldwell, Eugene Wilson (03 December 1870–20 June 1918), radiologist, was born in Savannah, Missouri, the son of William W. Caldwell, a prominent lawyer, and Camilla Kellogg. After Caldwell graduated from high school, the family moved to Concordia, Kansas, and at seventeen he enrolled at the University of Kansas in Lawrence to study electrical engineering. Beginning in his sophomore year, Caldwell worked as an assistant to physicist Lucien I. Blake, who requested Caldwell’s assistance for extended experiments in submarine telephony off the coast of Taunton, Massachusetts, during the summers....

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Failla, Gioacchino (19 July 1891–15 December 1961), physicist, was born in Sicily, Italy, the son of Nicolo Failla, a postal worker, and Sara Spoleti. When Gioacchino was three years old his father died. His mother then emigrated to the United States and left him with his paternal grandfather, a physician, who raised him for the next twelve years. Failla attended a private school in Cefalu. When he was fifteen years old his mother, who had been working as a seamstress, returned to Sicily to claim her son. She brought him to live with her in Manhattan in 1906....

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Kaplan, Henry Seymour (24 April 1918–04 February 1984), radiologist, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Nathan Kaplan, a dentist, and Sarah Brillant, a pharmacist. He earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago in 1938 and his medical degree from Rush Medical College just two years later. In 1942 he married Leah Hope Lebenson, a psychiatric social worker; they had two children....

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Lampe, Isadore (16 November 1906–25 January 1982), radiologist, was born Isadore Lampkovitz in London, England, the son of Anna Tamarkin, a Russian, and Joseph Lampkovitz, a cabinetmaker from Poland. He entered the United States when only four and a half months old, wrapped in a tallith, a Jewish prayer shawl. They family settled in Cleveland, Ohio, where they adopted the conservative practices of Orthodox Judaism developed in the United States. Young Isadore attended Mount Pleasant Elementary School and, at the same time, the Hebrew School. In 1923 he graduated with honors from Central High School....

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Lawrence, John Hundale (08 January 1904–07 September 1991), pioneer in nuclear medicine, was born in Canton, South Dakota, the son of Carl Gustav Lawrence, a teacher and school administrator, and Gunda Jacobson, a mathematics teacher. The Lawrences were a tightly knit family. As youths, John and his older brother, ...

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Pancoast, Henry Khunrath (26 February 1875–20 May 1939), physician and educator, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Seth Pancoast, a physician, and Susan George. In 1892 Pancoast graduated from Friends Central School in Philadelphia. He had decided to study medicine like his father, but the untimely death of both his parents necessitated his working in a bank before entering medical school. In 1896 he worked as a radiographer with ...

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Strax, Philip (01 January 1909–09 March 1999), radiologist, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Jacob Strax, a garment worker, and Molly Pelchow Strax. He received his B.S. degree from New York University in 1928 and remained there to attend medical school, earning his M.D. in 1931. He married Bertha Goldberg in 1932; they would have four children. On completing his internship and residencies at Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn (1931–1933) and New York Postgraduate Medical School (1933–1936), respectively, Strax opened a general family practice in Manhattan and also served as a roentgenologist at Bellevue Hospital....

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Warren, Stafford Leak (19 June 1896–26 July 1981), radiologist and educator, was born in Maxwell City, New Mexico, the son of Edwin S. Warren, an engineer, and Clara A. Leak. He was educated at the University of California at Berkeley, where he received a B.A. in 1918 and an M.A. in 1922. He received his M.D. from the University of California Medical School in San Francisco also in 1922. He worked as an assistant in pathology at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, followed by an internship at the Massachusetts General Hospital (1923–1924) and a residency at the Huntington Memorial Hospital (1924–1925) in Boston. He then joined the faculty of the Rochester (N.Y.) School of Medicine and Dentistry in 1926 as an assistant professor of radiology, where he quickly gained a reputation for knowledge in the use of radiation for the treatment of cancer. He rose to the position of full professor in 1933. His association with the University of Rochester continued until 1946. In 1937 he made a motion picture, in color and under high magnification, showing cancer cells spreading from a tumor in the ear of a live rabbit, a considerable achievement for the time....