1-11 of 11 results  for:

  • Medicine and health x
  • physician (general) x
  • prose fiction x
Clear all

Article

Fisher, Rudolph (09 May 1897–26 December 1934), Harlem Renaissance author and physician, was born in Washington, D.C., the son of John Wesley Fisher, a clergyman, and Glendora Williamson. Fisher was raised in Providence, Rhode Island, and in 1919 received his B.A. from Brown University, where he studied both English and biology. Fisher’s dual interests, literature and science, were reflected in his achievements at Brown, where he won numerous oratorical contests and was granted departmental honors in biology; the following year he received an M.A. in biology. In 1920 Fisher returned to Washington to attend Howard University Medical School. He graduated with highest honors in June 1924 and interned at Washington’s Freedman’s Hospital. Later that year Fisher married Jane Ryder, a local teacher, with whom he had one son....

Article

Green, Asa (11 February 1789–1837), physician and author, was born in Ashburnham, Massachusetts, the son of Oliver Green and Dorothy Hildreth. Green (sometimes spelled “Greene”) entered Williams College at the sophomore level and there earned a “good reputation as a scholar.” It is also at college where he is said to have been “distinguished for wit and vigor of thought,” aspects of which are reflected in his later literary efforts. He received an A.B. from Williams in 1813 and an M.D. from Brown University in 1822 and from the Berkshire Medical Institution in 1827....

Article

Hamilton, Alexander (26 September 1712–11 May 1756), physician and writer, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of Mary Robertson and William Hamilton, professor of divinity and principal at the University of Edinburgh, where Hamilton received his medical degree in 1737. Following the example of his oldest brother, John, Hamilton emigrated to Maryland in 1738 to establish a medical practice. By the time he died eighteen years later, he was regarded as “the most eminent Physician in Annapolis” (Upton Scott, Howard Family Papers, Maryland His. Soc.). In 1739 Hamilton joined the Ugly Club of Annapolis (the immediate precursor of the Tuesday Club), and in 1743 he was elected common councilman of Annapolis, an office he held until his death. By that time he was suffering from signs of consumption. To improve his health, he spent the summer of 1744 away from the muggy Maryland climate touring the northern colonies. Along the way, he kept a diary of his observations, the ...

Article

Mayo, William Starbuck (15 April 1811–22 November 1895), author and physician, was born in Ogdensburg, New York, the son of Obed Mayo, a shipbuilder, and Elizabeth Starbuck. Descended from the first minister of Boston’s North Church, Rev. John Mayo, on his father’s side and the Nantucket whaling and merchant Starbuck family on his mother’s, Mayo attended an academy in Potsdam and, choosing a career in medicine, first studied under two local physicians and then attended the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. After completing his medical studies in 1832, Mayo practiced for a few years in Ogdensburg, but after suffering from ill health he took a tour of Spain and the Barbary Coast of North Africa. These travel experiences were the material on which Mayo based most of his subsequent work as an author. After his travels, Mayo relocated his medical practice to New York and began to write professionally. In 1851 he married Helen Stuyvesant. They had no children....

Article

Mercier, Alfred (03 June 1816–12 May 1894), writer and physician, was born Charles Alfred Mercier in McDonoughville, Louisiana, the son of Jean-Baptiste Mercier, a plantation owner, and Marie-Héloïse Leduc. In accordance with the practice common among upper-class French families in Louisiana of educating their Creole sons in Paris, Mercier’s parents sent him to the Collège Louis le Grand in 1830. Inspired by his reading there of classical and romantic works—especially those by Sir Walter Scott, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Chateaubriand, and Lamartine—Mercier put off his previous intention of studying law in favor of pursuing literary ambitions. In 1838 he went back to Louisiana and then visited Boston to improve his English, but when his brother-in-law ...

Image

S. Weir Mitchell. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B029404).

Article

Mitchell, S. Weir (15 February 1828–04 January 1914), physician and writer, was born Silas Weir Mitchell in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of John Kearsley Mitchell, a physician and professor of medicine, and Sarah Matilda Henry. He entered the University of Pennsylvania at the age of fifteen and in his second year was ranked first in his class, but withdrew after three years because of the illness of his father. He enrolled in 1848 in Jefferson Medical College, where his father taught, and finished the two-year course at age twenty-one. He continued his studies in Paris, where he spent a year in research with several eminent scientists such as the physiologist Claude Bernard and the microscopist Charles Phillippe Robin. In 1851 he returned to Philadelphia to help with the medical practice of his ailing father and by 1855 was the sole supporter of the family. In 1858 he married Mary Middleton Elwyn, who bore him two sons before her death, from diphtheria, in 1862. When his father died in 1858, Mitchell took over his practice....

Article

Shecut, John Linnaeus Edward Whitridge (04 December 1770–01 June 1836), botanist, medical practitioner, and author, was born in Beaufort, South Carolina, the son of Abraham Shecut and Marie Barbary. His Huguenot forebears had left France and settled in Switzerland, but his parents had come to America about 1768 and settled in Beaufort. They moved to Charleston before Shecut was ten years old. At sixteen he studied medicine under ...

Article

Testut, Charles (1819?–01 July 1892), Romantic literary artist, journalist, and physician, was born Charles-Hippolyte-Joseph Testut in Auxerre, France, and though he emigrated to the United States in the late 1830s when he was in his early twenties, he remained a French citizen until his death in New Orleans, Louisiana. The details of Testut’s personal life are sketchy. In his writings he alluded to a brother, Eugène, and a sister, Marie, and he cherished the memory of his father, whom he referred to as a high-ranking official in the Rosicrucian movement. He also mentioned his wife and children and spoke fondly of his dozen or so grandchildren. It appears, however, that when he settled permanently in New Orleans in 1871 his family resided elsewhere....

Image

William Carlos Williams Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-109601).

Article

Williams, William Carlos (17 September 1883–04 March 1963), author and physician, was born in Rutherford, New Jersey, the son of William George Williams, a New York businessman of British extraction, and Raquel Hélène Hoheb, who was from Puerto Rico. William Carlos Williams spoke Spanish and French as well as English. From 1897 to 1899 he was schooled in Switzerland, with some time in Paris. In 1902 he graduated from high school in New York and was accepted into the dental school of the University of Pennsylvania, but soon transferred to the medical school. There began his long-lived friendships with ...