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Gaillard, David Du Bose (04 September 1859–05 December 1913), soldier and engineer, was born in Fulton, Sumter County, South Carolina, the son of Samuel Isaac Gaillard (pronounced Ge- yard), a planter, and Susan Richardson Du Bose. He received an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy in 1880. His high standing in the graduating class of 1884 entitled him to a commission in the Corps of Engineers as a second lieutenant and admission to the army’s Engineer School of Application, Willets Point, New York. He completed the course in 1887 and was promoted to first lieutenant. That year he married Katherine Ross Davis; they had one child....

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George Washington Goethals Photograph by Arnold Genthe, 1913. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-G432-0358-A).

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Goethals, George Washington (29 June 1858–21 January 1928), engineer and military officer, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of John Louis Goethals, a carpenter, and Marie Le Barron. At the age of fourteen he entered the College of the City of New York. In April 1876, after three years of college, Goethals won a cadetship to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He graduated second in his class in 1880, a distinction that won for him a commission as second lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers....

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Groves, Leslie Richard, Jr. (17 August 1896–13 July 1970), army officer and engineer, was born in Albany, New York, the son of Leslie R. Groves, Sr., a Presbyterian minister, and Gwen Griffith. When his father became an army chaplain, Groves accompanied him around various camps in the United States, Cuba, and the Philippines. In 1913 he enrolled for a year at the University of Washington and also completed two more years at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology before entering the U.S. Military Academy in 1916. Groves graduated fourth in his class in November 1918 and was commissioned a second lieutenant of engineers. He subsequently attended the Engineer School at Camp A. A. Humphreys (now Fort Belvoir, Va.) for an additional year of training before completing a three-month tour of occupation duty in France with the American Expeditionary Force immediately after World War I. By 1919 Groves was back at the Engineer School, where he completed several civil engineering courses and graduated in 1921. In 1922 he married Grace Wilson; they had two daughters....

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Jadwin, Edgar (07 August 1865–02 March 1931), soldier and engineer, was born in Honesdale, Pennsylvania, the son of Cornelius Comegys Jadwin, a druggist, and Charlotte Ellen Wood. He attended Lafayette College for two years and then in 1886 received an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, from which he graduated first in his class four years later. Jadwin was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army Corps of Engineers and assigned as senior inspector on the project to enlarge the immigration station at Ellis Island, New York. In February 1891 he reported to the Engineer School of Application at Willet’s Point, New York, where he took the postgraduate course; he remained as quartermaster of the battalion of engineers until 1895, when he became the assistant to the district engineer in Wilmington, North Carolina, working on various river and harbor improvements. In October 1897 he became an assistant in the Fortification Section in the Office of the Chief of Engineers in Washington, D.C....

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Pick, Lewis Andrew (18 November 1890–02 December 1956), U.S. Army officer and civil engineer, was born in Brookneal, Virginia, the son of George Washington Pick, a railroad employee, and Annie Crouch. Pick graduated in 1914 from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, Virginia, with a degree in civil engineering. He then served two years as a civil engineer with the Southern Railway....

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Taylor, Harry (26 June 1862–28 January 1930), soldier, was born in Sanbornton Bridge, New Hampshire, the son of John Franklin and Lydia J. Proctor. He attended the New Hampshire Conference Seminary until he was accepted as a cadet at the U.S. Military Academy in 1880. He graduated in 1884 and was commissioned in the Corps of Engineers as a second lieutenant. Excepting one year as an assistant professor of mathematics at the Military Academy in 1888–1889, Taylor spent most of his first ten years of army service at river and harbor work sites along both coasts of the United States....