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Carey, Henry Charles (15 December 1793–13 October 1879), economist, publisher, and social scientist, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Mathew Carey, an economist and publisher, and Bridget Flavahan. His father, an Irish patriot and political exile, also worked periodically in social science. Carey never received any formal education and instead was taught by his father. In addition, he read many of the books that made their way through his father’s publishing house, Carey & Lea (later known as Carey, Lea & Carey). In 1802 he went to work for his father, eventually becoming a partner and head of the firm, which was at the time the largest publishing and bookselling house in the country. Carey became the American publisher for Thomas Carlyle, Sir Walter Scott, and ...

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Carey, Mathew (28 January 1760–16 September 1839), publisher and economist, was born in Dublin, Ireland, the son of Christopher Carey, a prosperous baker, and Mary Sherridan, both Catholics. He was an avid reader but not a good student. He was taunted at school because of his lameness (the result of having been dropped by a nurse) and his small stature; for the rest of his life he was quick to take offense at any imagined slight to his dignity. In 1775 he was apprenticed to a bookseller who was also copublisher of the ...

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Kenedy, Patrick John (04 September 1843–04 January 1906), Catholic book publisher and real estate developer, was born in New York City, the son of John Kenedy, also a Catholic book publisher, and his second wife, Bridget Smith. John Kenedy emigrated from Ireland to the United States in 1815 and lived in various cities, including St. Louis, where he married Ellen Timon, with whom he had six children. They eventually settled in 1826 in Baltimore, where Kenedy opened a small book shop and publishing firm. After Ellen’s premature death in 1835, John and his children moved to New York City, where he reestablished his bookselling and publishing firm. Because of the large number of publishing firms in the city and the growing Irish and Catholic immigrant population, Kenedy decided to specialize in publishing Catholic books. His store soon became a meeting place for exiled Irishmen....

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Loudon, Samuel (1727?–24 February 1813), printer and entrepreneur, was born probably in Scotland. He emigrated to New York in or before 1753, when he established a general store opposite the Old Slip Market. During the next decade and a half, he expanded his business and personal interests. On 24 January 1756 he married Sarah Oakes. By 1757 he had enlarged his trade to sell nautical goods. By 1768 Sarah had died, and Loudon had married his second wife, Lydia Griswold. He had a total of eight children. In the late 1760s and early 1770s he speculated in upper New York land with ...

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Scherman, Harry (01 February 1887–12 November 1969), publisher, was born in Montreal, Canada, the son of Jacob Scherman, a laborer, and Katharine Harris, both of whom were Jewish. In 1889 the family moved to Philadelphia. In 1893 the father deserted his family and returned to his native England. Living in poverty in a boardinghouse with his hard-working mother, Scherman attended Central High School in Philadelphia, where fellow classmates included ...

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Schuster, Max Lincoln (02 March 1897–20 December 1970), publisher, was born Max Schuster in Kalusz, Austria, the son of Barnet Schuster and Minnie Stieglitz, both of whom were American citizens. The family returned to the United States when Max was seven weeks old. The Schusters lived in New York City and ran a stationery and cigar store in Harlem. They later moved to the Washington Heights neighborhood of upper Manhattan, where Max attended public school. In high school he became so interested in ...

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Stratemeyer, Edward (04 October 1862–10 May 1930), writer, creator of popular juvenile series, and founder of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, the son of German immigrants Henry Julius Stratemeyer, a tobacconist, and Anna Siegal. The youngest of six children, Stratemeyer worked in his brother’s tobacco store after completing high school. Even as an adolescent, Stratemeyer experimented with writing and distributing stories; a 31-page pamphlet, “The Tale of a Lumberman (as Told by Himself),” from 1878 is the earliest example of his amateur printing efforts. Five years later he published an amateur—and short-lived—boy’s story paper, ...