1-6 of 6 results  for:

  • Quaker layperson x
  • Religion and belief x
  • politicians in American or USA x
Clear all

Article

Kinsey, John (1693–11 May 1750), Quaker politician and lawyer, was born in Philadelphia, the son of John Kinsey, a carpenter, politician, and Quaker minister, and Sarah Stevens. The younger John Kinsey likely attended the Friends Public School until the family moved to Woodbridge, New Jersey, sometime between 1702 and 1704. The older Kinsey placed him with a joiner in New York as an apprentice, but as a friend wrote after Kinsey’s death, “having an Inquisitive disposition, and a Genius for something above his then employ, he left his master before his time was out, & applied himself to the Study of the Law.” He probably studied in Philadelphia with ...

Article

Lloyd, David ( ?1656–06 April 1731), leading Quaker legislator and jurist of early Pennsylvania, was born in Manafon, Montgomeryshire, Wales, the son of Thomas Lloyd. (His mother’s name is unknown.) After grammar school, Lloyd studied law with George Jeffries, the Welshman who later became lord chief justice of the King’s Bench and lord chancellor of England. On the basis of this legal training, ...

Article

Norris, Isaac (26 July 1671–04 June 1735), Quaker politician, provincial Pennsylvania officeholder, and merchant, was born in Southwark, London, England, the son of Thomas Norris, a Quaker carpenter, and Mary Moore. About 1678 his family immigrated to Port Royal, Jamaica. The extent of his formal education is unknown, but in adulthood he was well read in both classical Latin authors and the best of contemporary English literature. He first visited Philadelphia on a trading voyage in 1692; during his absence his father was killed in the earthquake that destroyed Port Royal on 7 June 1692, and his brother and sister died shortly thereafter. Norris settled permanently in Philadelphia about 1693. He gained important political and commercial connections through his marriage in 1694 to Mary Lloyd, a daughter of ...

Article

Norris, Isaac (23 October 1701–13 July 1766), Quaker political leader and Philadelphia merchant, was born in Philadelphia, the son of Isaac Norris and Mary Lloyd, who as members of the Society of Friends joined in William Penn’s “Holy Experiment” and settled in Philadelphia in 1694. The junior Isaac Norris was educated at the Friends’ School. In adulthood he was, like his father, devoted to books; as his biographer George Washington Norris wrote, Norris “might indeed be called learned; for, in addition to a knowledge of Hebrew, he wrote in Latin and French with ease, and his reading was extensive.” By the time Norris came of age, his father had been for many years one of Philadelphia’s most successful merchants. The family was prosperous enough to send Norris to England in 1722 for several months; he returned to England for a longer visit in 1734–1735, at which time he also traveled on the Continent. He managed the family firm, Norris and Company, during his father’s later years and became the senior partner after his father died in 1735. Norris married Sarah Logan, ...

Article

Pusey, Caleb (1651–25 February 1728), political leader and Quaker tract writer, was born in Berkshire, England, the son of William Pusey and Margaret (maiden name unknown). He became a Baptist in 1659 but sometime during the next decade converted to Quakerism and in 1672 wrote a tract against his former church insisting that Friends endorsed essential Christian doctrines. While working in London as a lastmaker, in 1681 he married Anne Stone Worley (or Wharley), a widow, and the next year migrated to Pennsylvania, acquiring 250 acres for £5. Pusey served as manager with a one-thirty-second share of a gristmill in Upland, Pennsylvania, owned principally by absentees, including ...

Article

Shippen, Edward (1639– August 1712), merchant, religious martyr, and political leader, was born in Yorkshire, England, the son of William Shippen, a prominent landholder, and Mary Nunnes (or Nuns). Although his older brother earned degrees at Oxford and became an Anglican clergyman, Edward in 1668 emigrated to Boston, Massachusetts, a wilderness town of about 3,500. In 1671 he married Elizabeth Lybrand; they had eight children during their seventeen years together. Not long after he joined an artillery company, Shippen converted to his wife’s faith and became a member of the Society of Friends....