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Coe, George Albert (26 March 1862–09 November 1951), psychologist of religion, religious educator, and political activist, was born in Mendon, New York, the son of the Reverend George W. Coe, a Methodist minister, and Harriet Van Voorhis. He completed the A.B. at the University of Rochester in 1884 and then enrolled in the Boston University School of Theology, where he received the S.T.B. in 1887 and the A.M. in philosophy and world religions in 1888. In 1891, after a year of study at the University of Berlin, he completed a Ph.D. at the Boston University School of All Sciences....

Article

Guiles, Austin Philip (23 June 1894–13 November 1953), theological educator, was born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, the son of Austin Greenclay Guiles (occupation unknown) and Hanna Davis. After serving with the U.S. Army Ambulance Corps in Italy (1917–1919), Guiles, called “Phil,” earned degrees from Princeton University (A.B., 1921), Columbia University (M.A., 1923), New York’s Union Theological Seminary (B.D., 1925), and the University of Edinburgh (Ph.D., 1934, with a dissertation entitled “Mental Therapy and the Forgiveness of Sins; A Clinical View of the Results of Sin, with Psychological Studies of Religious Leaders …”). He was ordained to the Presbyterian ministry in 1924 and became a Congregationalist in 1939. He served as pastor of Union Church, Palisade, New Jersey (1925–1927), and later as associate to pastors at the Old South Church in Boston (1931–1933). He married Louise Earhart in 1925; they had four children....

Article

Johnson, Paul Emanuel (19 February 1898–01 September 1974), theological educator and psychologist, was born in Niantic, Connecticut, the son of John Edward Johnson, a Methodist clergyman, and Martha Cadwallander. He attended schools in Waterloo, Iowa, and in 1920 received his A.B. degree from Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, Iowa. In 1921 he was awarded an A.M. degree from the University of Chicago. He received a professional theological degree, the S.T.B., from the Boston University School of Theology in 1923 and in 1928 earned a Ph.D. in philosophy of religion from Boston University. In 1922 he married Evelyn Grant, who provided him with intellectual and emotional support throughout his career; they had two children....

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Ladd, George Trumbull (19 January 1842–08 August 1921), theologian, philosopher, and psychologist, was born in Painesville, Ohio, the son of Silas Trumbull Ladd, a businessman and treasurer of Western Reserve College, and Elizabeth Williams. Ladd graduated from Western Reserve College in 1864 and from Andover Theological Seminary in 1869. Also in 1869 he married Cornelia Ann Tallman of Bellaire, Ohio; they had four children. He was a minister for nearly a decade, spending two years in a small church in Ohio and eight years in the large Spring Street Congregational Church in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Ladd wrote and read feverishly throughout his life. Having a passion for scholarship, he grew tired of the pastorate and sought freedom in the academic world. He justified this transition by planning a defense of his faith in opposition to the increasingly scientific and secular world. According to his biographer E. S. Mills, “he would serve as the mediator between the old and the new so that the best of both worlds of learning and experience might be preserved.” In 1879 Ladd accepted a post in the department of philosophy at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. Two years later he moved to New Haven, Connecticut, and began his long association with Yale University. At Yale, Ladd was appointed professor of moral and mental philosophy....

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Pace, Edward Aloysius (03 July 1861–26 April 1938), Catholic priest and scholar, was born in Starke, Florida, the son of George Edward Pace, a Methodist planter and manufacturer of turpentine, and Margaret Kelly, a Catholic and daughter of the comptroller of the Port of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The first of eight children, Pace attended Duval High School in Jacksonville (1872–1876) and St. Charles College in Ellicott City, Maryland, a preparatory seminary (1876–1880, A.B.). He then became a seminarian at the North American College in Rome, studying philosophy (1880–1882) and theology (1882–1886, S.T.D.) at the Urbanian College. One of his professors was Francesco Satolli, a promoter of the Thomistic revival. Pace was ordained priest on 30 May 1885 for the Diocese of St. Augustine....

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Walters, Sister Annette (18 May 1910–22 February 1978), experimental psychologist, educator, and Catholic nun, was born Margaret Anna Walters in Elmwood, Wisconsin, the second child and only daughter of Emil A. Walters and Anna Berglund. Raised in the Lutheran faith in Minneapolis, Walters attended public schools until her mother placed her in St. Margaret’s Academy, which was staffed and administered by the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondolet (CSJ). In 1927 Walters enrolled at the College of St. Catherine (later St. Catherine’s University) in St. Paul, Minnesota, with plans to pursue a career in medicine. She converted to Catholicism during her sophomore year, and in February 1929 she entered the Sisters of St. Joseph as a postulant. Several months later she was given the religious name of Sister Annette....