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Andrews, Lorrin (29 April 1795–29 September 1868), missionary and educator, was born in East Windsor (now Vernon), Connecticut, the son of Samuel Andrews and his wife, whose name is unknown. Andrews grew up on the frontier in Kentucky and Ohio and later attended Jefferson College in Pennsylvania. After graduation he studied at Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey, where he graduated in 1825. He worked as a mechanic and printer while in school, and later as a teacher. On 26 April 1827 he volunteered his services to the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) and was accepted for work in the Sandwich Islands, as Hawaii was then called. His various job experiences and his life in rough pioneer country where hard work was valued prepared him well for his missionary tasks....

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Boardman, Sarah Hall (04 November 1803–01 September 1845), Baptist missionary and translator, was born in Alstead, New Hampshire, the daughter of Ralph Hall and Abiah O. Hall (her maiden name). Sarah learned Latin, read widely in Christian apologetics and philosophy, and taught school for a time. She was also a writer and poet, and as the eldest of thirteen children, she helped to raise her siblings. Sarah converted to the Christian faith at age sixteen and was baptized by Lucius Bolles, a Baptist pastor in Salem, Massachusetts. In 1825 she married the Reverend George Dana Boardman; they had three children. The couple then accepted a missionary assignment with the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions in Burma. Temporarily detained in Calcutta, India, due to the Burmese War, they arrived in Moulmain in 1827 and settled in Tavoy in 1828. In 1831 George died, and Boardman was left with her children in Tavoy, which was under military siege....

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Goodell, William (14 February 1792–18 February 1867), missionary and linguist, was born in Templeton, Massachusetts, the son of William Goodell and Phebe Newton, farmers. Goodell’s father was too poor to provide an education for his son but recognized that his mind was keen and that his physique was not suited for hard manual labor. Consequently he encouraged Goodell to seek aid from the charity fund at Phillips Academy in Andover. At the age of fifteen he packed all of his belongings and walked sixty miles to Andover, where he so impressed the preceptor ...

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Jones, George Heber (14 August 1867–11 May 1919), Methodist missionary and student of Korean culture, was born in Mohawk, New York, the son of Charles Edward Jones and Susan Cosser. Educated in the public schools of Utica, New York, he left for the Korean mission field at the age of twenty in 1887, less than three years after the Methodist church had begun its work there. American Methodists William B. Scranton and Henry Gerhardt Appenzeller had reached Seoul, Korea, early in 1885 and realized the daunting obstacles they faced, principally profound cultural differences and local suspicions. But they persevered and in 1886 called for two new men to augment their work. In 1887 Jones accompanied Franklin Ollinger, a veteran missionary, to Seoul. Two years later other Methodist missionaries arrived, notably women. This small staff endured continual hardships, including disease and political turmoil, in establishing an enduring Methodist presence in Korea....

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Kellogg, Samuel Henry (06 September 1839–03 May 1899), missionary-linguist and pastor, was born in Quogue, Suffolk County, New York, the son of Samuel Kellogg, a Presbyterian minister, and Mary Pierce Henry. As a child he was precocious but frail, and he received his early education at home, except for about six months at Haverstraw (N.Y.) Mountain Institute. He attended Williams College briefly in 1856 but withdrew because of ill health. He matriculated at Princeton University in 1858 and graduated in 1861 as one of the top two graduates of the 100 members of his class. He then entered Princeton Seminary, from which he graduated in 1864. During his final seminary year, he was an instructor in mathematics at the college....

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Pareja, Francisco (15??–15 June? 1628?), priest and missionary, was born in Aunon, diocese of Toledo, Spain. Nothing is known about his birth, parentage, or life before his arrival in Florida in 1595 except that he entered the Franciscan Order of Friars Minor in the order’s province of Castile....

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Riggs, Stephen Return (23 March 1812–24 August 1883), missionary and linguist, was born in Steubenville, Ohio, the son of Stephen Riggs, a blacksmith, and Anna Baird. He was educated at the Latin school in Ripley, Ohio, at Jefferson College, and for one year at Western Theological Seminary. On 6 April 1836 he was ordained by the Chillicothe Presbytery at West Union, Ohio. He preached for a year in Hawley, Massachusetts, where in February 1837, he married Mary A. C. Longley, to whom he had become engaged while she was teaching school in southern Indiana. The couple had eight children. Her father, General Thomas Longley, was for many years in the General Court of Massachusetts, and her grandfather, Colonel Edmund Longley, had served under Washington....

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Van Dyck, Cornelius Van Alen (13 August 1818–13 November 1895), medical missionary and translator of the Bible into Arabic, was born in Kinderhook, New York, the son of Henry L. Van Dyck, a physician, and Catherine Van Alen. He attended Kinderhook Academy and studied medicine under his father before going to Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, where he earned his M.D. in 1839....