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Henningsen, Charles Frederick (21 February 1815–14 June 1877), filibuster and author, was born in either England or Belgium. The names and occupations of his parents are unknown. As “a man apparently without a country” ( New York Times, 15 June 1877), Henningsen began his career fighting for the Carlists in Spain in 1834, serving under general Thomas Zumalacarregui. In 1835 he was awarded the title Knight of St. Ferdinand and Knight of Isabella for his service. Following his Spanish campaign, Henningsen joined the revolutionary Schamyl in Circassia. He was a fugitive in Asia Minor, when in 1848 the Magyars, under the leadership of Louis Kossuth, rebelled against Austrian control. Offering his services to Kossuth, who was in exile following the failure of the revolution, Henningsen was appointed plenipotentiary. He followed the Hungarian leader to America as his personal secretary in 1851. Remaining in the United States, he married Williamina Belt Connelly, a widow and niece of Georgia senator ...

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Ingraham, Prentiss (28 December 1843–16 August 1904), writer and soldier, was born in Adams County, Mississippi, the son of Joseph Holt Ingraham, a minister and writer, and Mary Brooks, the daughter of a wealthy southern planter. Ingraham attended Jefferson College (Miss.) and Mobile Medical College until the Civil War ended his academic career. At the age of seventeen, Ingraham enlisted in Colonel William Temple Withers’s Mississippi Regiment; he later served as a scout commander in a Texas cavalry brigade. At the siege of Port Hudson, Ingraham was wounded in the foot and captured, but he escaped while being transported to a northern prison....