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Daniel Barnard. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-99337).

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Barnard, Daniel Dewey (11 September 1796–24 April 1861), lawyer, congressman, and diplomat, was born in East Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Timothy Barnard, a county judge, and Phebe Dewey. Barnard’s early years were spent on the family farm near Hartford, Connecticut. When he was twelve the family moved to Mendon, New York (near Rochester). His formal education started with a year at Lenox Academy, after which he transferred to Williams College, where he graduated in 1818....

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Bayard, Richard Henry (26 September 1796–04 March 1868), lawyer, senator, and diplomat, was born in Wilmington, Delaware, the son of James Asheton Bayard, a Federalist leader, and Ann Bassett. Bayard graduated from Princeton College in 1814 and then read for the law. Toward the end of the War of 1812 his studies were briefly interrupted by military service. In 1815 he married Mary Sophia Carroll, granddaughter of ...

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Bidlack, Benjamin Alden (08 September 1804–06 February 1849), lawyer, legislator, and diplomat, was born in Paris, Oneida County, New York, the son of Benjamin Bidlack, a pioneer farmer, and Lydia Alden Bidlack. After his family relocated to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, Bidlack completed his education at local public schools and the Wilkes-Barre Academy. Intent on a career in law, he studied law in the office of Garrick Mallery, a local attorney, and was appointed deputy attorney for Luzerne County shortly after gaining admittance to the state bar. After an early marriage to Fanny Stewart ended shortly after it began (for reasons that are not known), Bidlack married Margaret Wallace on 8 September 1829. The couple had seven children....

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Bingham, Robert Worth (08 November 1871–18 December 1937), lawyer, newspaper publisher, and diplomat, was born in Mebane, North Carolina, the son of Robert Bingham, an educator, and Delphine Louise Worth. Bingham graduated from the Bingham School, a private school run by his father, and from 1888 to 1890 attended the University of North Carolina (no degree). He married Eleanor Everhart Miller in 1896; they had three children. He received a law degree from the University of Louisville a year later and, settling in Louisville, went into law practice with fellow North Carolinian W. W. Davies....

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Blount, James Henderson (12 September 1837–08 March 1903), lawyer, congressman, and special diplomatic envoy, was born near the village of Clinton, Jones County, Georgia, the son of Thomas Blount and Mary Ricketts, planters. Blount, whose parents died during his childhood, was raised in the household of his older half-brother, David Blount. He attended private schools in Clinton, Georgia, and Tuscaloosa, Alabama, before graduating with honors from the University of Georgia in 1858. He read law and was admitted to the Georgia bar in 1859, and after a brief practice in Clinton, joined the firm of Anderson and Simmons in nearby Macon....

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Joseph Hodges Choate. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-90753).

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Choate, Joseph Hodges (24 January 1832–14 May 1917), lawyer and diplomat, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, the son of George Choate, a physician, and Margaret Manning. He was the salutatorian of the Harvard class of 1852 and graduated from Harvard Law School in 1854. He was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1855, and in 1857, after admission to the New York bar, became a partner in the firm of Evarts, Southmayd, and Choate. In October 1861 he married Caroline Dutcher Sterling; they had six children....

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Clark, Daniel (1766–13 August 1813), merchant, diplomat, and territorial delegate, was born in Sligo, Ireland. Although his parents’ names are unknown, his family’s wealth and connections were sufficient to provide him with an education at Eton and other English schools. Declining fortunes in Ireland prompted the Clarks in 1785 or 1786 to emigrate to America, where they settled in Germantown, outside of Philadelphia....

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Cassius Marcellus Clay. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-109862).

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Clay, Cassius Marcellus (19 October 1810–22 July 1903), antislavery politician and diplomat, was born in White Hall, Kentucky, the son of Green Clay, a land speculator, and Sally Lewis. Green Clay was one of the wealthiest landowners and slaveholders in Kentucky, and young Cassius was raised in comfort and affluence. He attended Transylvania University (1829–1831) and Yale College (1831–1832), where he received his bachelor’s degree. After returning to Transylvania to study law in 1832–1833, Clay married Mary Jane Warfield in 1833. The marriage produced ten children....

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Cooper, John Sherman (23 August 1901–21 February 1991), lawyer, senator, and diplomat, was born in Somerset, Kentucky, the son of John Sherman Cooper and Helen Gertrude Tartar. His father, considered the wealthiest man in town and a leader in Pulaski County, was both a county and a circuit judge, as his father had been before him. It was “assumed that the next generation of Coopers would provide the county its leaders” (Krebs, p. 13). Cooper attended Centre College in Kentucky, then Yale University, where he received his degree in 1923. He began to study law at Harvard but returned to Kentucky in 1925 because his father’s death and a recession in 1920 had depleted the family’s resources. During the next twenty-five years Cooper assumed financial responsibility for the family and sent his six brothers and sisters to college. He gained admission to the bar in 1928 at age twenty-seven....

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Curtin, Andrew Gregg (22 April 1815–07 October 1894), lawyer, politician, and diplomat, was born in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, the son of Roland Curtin, an iron manufacturer and county coroner and sheriff, and Jane Gregg, the daughter of U.S. congressman and senator Andrew Gregg. After attending private academies near his home, Curtin studied law with W. W. Potter of Bellefonte and with Judge ...

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Dana, Francis (13 June 1743–25 April 1811), public official, diplomat, and jurist, was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, the son of Richard Dana, a lawyer, and Lydia Trowbridge. Francis entered Harvard College in 1758 and graduated in 1762. He received an M.A. from Harvard in 1765 at the same time that he was studying law in Cambridge with his uncle Edward Trowbridge. Dana was admitted to the Massachusetts bar in 1767 and became successful in his practice. In 1773 he married Elizabeth Ellery, daughter of ...

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Davies, Joseph Edward (29 November 1876–09 May 1958), lawyer, diplomat, and author, was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, the son of Edward Davies, a successful wagonmaker, and Rahel Paynter, a minister of the Welsh Congregationalist church. An outstanding high school and university student, Davies took an A.B. and an LL.B. at the University of Wisconsin and practiced law in his home county from 1902 to 1906. He married Emlen Knight in 1902; they had three children....

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Davis, Bancroft (29 December 1822–27 December 1907), jurist and diplomat, was born John Chandler Bancroft Davis in Worcester, Massachusetts, the son of John Davis (1761–1847), a congressman, senator, and three-time governor nicknamed “Honest John,” and Eliza Davis, sister of historian George Bancroft. A member of the Harvard class of 1840, Davis was suspended in his senior year for unknown reasons but was nevertheless awarded his A.B. by Harvard in 1847. By that time he had already studied law, been admitted to the Massachusetts bar, opened an office in New York City, and published ...

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Dean, Arthur Hobson (16 October 1898–30 November 1987), lawyer, government adviser, and diplomat, was born in Ithaca, New York, the son of William Cameron Dean, an engineering laboratory assistant, and Maud Campbell Egan. In 1915 Dean enrolled at Cornell University, where he earned money for expenses working as a night clerk at a hotel and as a bookkeeper at a bank. He interrupted his studies to serve in the navy during World War I. Returning to Cornell following peace, Dean received his A.B. in 1921. He then studied law at Cornell, where he was managing editor of the ...

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Denby, Charles (16 June 1830–13 January 1904), lawyer and diplomat, was born at “Mount Joy,” the home of his mother’s family in Botetourt County, Virginia, and was the son of Nathaniel Denby, a Richmond merchant, and Jane Harvey. After attending Georgetown College in Washington, D.C., and the Collège Royal in Marseilles, France, he graduated with honors from Virginia Military Institute in 1850. He taught at the Masonic University in Selma, Alabama, before moving to Evansville, Indiana, in 1853. He read law while employed as political editor of the city’s Democratic newspaper, the ...

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Durham, John Stephens (18 July 1861–16 October 1919), diplomat, lawyer, and journalist, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Samuel Durham and Elizabeth Stephens. Two of his uncles, Clayton Durham and Jeremiah Durham, were noted clergymen who helped Bishop Richard Allen establish the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) church. A mulatto, Durham studied in the Philadelphia public schools, graduating from the Institute for Colored Youth in 1876....

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Eames, Charles (20 March 1812–16 March 1867), lawyer and diplomat, was born in New Braintree, Massachusetts. Little is known of his parents, except that his mother descended from Ebenezer Tidd, who had settled in New Braintree after emigrating from Lexington, Massachusetts, in 1768. Eames attended the Leicester Academy and Harvard, graduating in 1831. After a year at Harvard Law School, he continued his law studies in New York City with attorney ...