1-4 of 4 results  for:

  • music industry x
  • Religion and belief x
Clear all

Article

Bradbury, William Batchelder (06 October 1816–07 January 1868), music teacher, composer, and publisher, was born in York County, Maine, the son of David Bradbury and Sophia Chase. When Bradbury was fourteen years old the family moved to Boston, where William began the study of harmony and decided to become a professional musician. He attended the Boston Academy of Music, sang in ...

Article

Rodeheaver, Homer Alvin (04 October 1880–18 December 1955), evangelist, musician, and music publisher, was born in Cinco Hollow, Ohio, the son of Thurman Hall Rodeheaver, who was in the lumber mill business, and Francis “Fannie” Armstrong. As a young man growing up in the mountain logging village of Jellico, in East Tennessee, he was exposed to rural singing school music and fiddle dance music from the Scots-Irish settlers in the area. As a boy he also learned to play the cornet. He attended Ohio Wesleyan College in 1896; there he switched to trombone, played in the college band, took music courses, and served as a cheerleader. He interrupted college to serve in the Fourth Tennessee Band in the Spanish-American War, and after the war, though initially drawn to the law, in about 1904 he joined evangelist ...

Article

Thompson, Will Lamartine (07 November 1847–20 September 1909), composer and publisher, was born in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, the son of Josiah Thompson and Sarah Jackman. His father was self-educated and worked for a time as a clerk on the wharf in Pittsburgh. He became a successful merchant and, about the time of Will’s birth, moved to East Liverpool, Ohio, where he established the mercantile firm of J. Thompson and Company. Three of his sons, including Will, were to be partners in the firm, and Will also served on the board of directors of the East Liverpool Bank, which his father established in 1873. The Thompson family was highly regarded in the East Liverpool area, and Josiah Thompson was elected to the fifty-eighth (1868), fifty-ninth (1870), and sixtieth (1872) sessions of the Ohio legislature....

Article

Webb, Thomas Smith (30 October 1771–06 July 1819), author of Masonic music and rituals and a founder of the Handel and Haydn Society, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Samuel Webb and Margaret Smith. His parents had emigrated from England sometime in 1771. He studied at local grammar schools and then at the Boston Latin School. Known for his “sweetness of disposition,” he was a bright and precocious student. He wrote poetry, played the fife and flute, and became proficient in French. When he was sixteen he was apprenticed to a printer in Boston. A few years later he moved to Keene, New Hampshire, and set up his own printing shop. In Keene he became acquainted with Freemasonry and received the first three degrees of the Ancient Craft from the Rising Sun Lodge....