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Kelser, Raymond Alexander (02 December 1892–16 April 1952), bacteriologist and veterinarian, was born in Washington, D.C., the son of Charles Kelser, a mechanic, and Josie Mary Potter. The family, which was not well off, lived in Baltimore, Maryland, for a few years before returning to Washington. There Kelser attended public schools and decided during his elementary grades that he would enter medicine or law. His interest in law was the result of spending “countless hours” attending sessions of Congress and of various courts....

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Law, James (13 February 1838–10 May 1921), veterinarian, educator, and public health advocate, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of John Law and Grace Turner, farmers. In 1857 he graduated from the Veterinary College in Edinburgh and then continued scientific study at the medical school of Edinburgh University and at veterinary schools in France at Alfort (near Paris) and Lyons. Returning to Scotland, he became a protégé of John Gamgee, a cosmopolitan English veterinarian who promoted the view that epizootics (diseases affecting many animals) were caused by minute organisms, not noxious fumes, changes in the weather, or poor ventilation. By siding with the controversial Gamgee, Law abandoned the anticontagionist views held by British veterinarians in general and by his Edinburgh teacher, William Dick. In 1860 Law joined the faculty of Gamgee’s New Veterinary College in Edinburgh and taught anatomy and materia medica. In so doing he joined the minority of veterinary educators who sought to improve veterinary education by placing it in a scientific framework. Although he had been certified as a veterinary surgeon by the Highland and Agricultural Society in 1857, he also took and passed the examination of the rival Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London) in 1861, thereby becoming a member and in 1877, rising to fellow. In 1863 he married Eliza Crighton in Edinburgh; they had three daughters and one son. When Gamgee reestablished the New Veterinary College in London in 1865 as the Royal Albert Veterinary College, Law moved with him. However, the Royal Albert failed to compete for students with the Royal Veterinary College, and Law left to practice in Ireland....

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Lyman, Charles Parker (01 September 1846–01 February 1918), educator and veterinarian, was born in New York City, the son of Jabez Whiting Lyman, a partner in a Boston dry goods store, and Mary Ainsworth Parker. Lyman married Lucy E. Pope in 1868; they had a son and a daughter. He graduated from the Veterinary College (Edinburgh, Scotland) in 1874 and then returned to the United States to establish a practice in Springfield, Massachusetts. Between 1877 and 1879 he taught veterinary courses at the Massachusetts Agriculture College (now the University of Massachusetts, Amherst). During these same two years he also served as president of the U.S. Veterinary Medical Association. In 1880, for U.S. commissioner of agriculture William G. Le Duc, he undertook an extensive study of contagious bovine pleuro-pneumonia, one of several animal diseases (epizootics) threatening the beef and dairy industries. This work took him to most East Coast stockyards and seaports. In addition he traveled to Great Britain in order to persuade officials there to lift their embargo on imported cattle from the United States. Although unsuccessful in this part of his task, his four reports on this economically devastating disease were widely disseminated and served to convince the public, livestock owners, and politicians that bovine pleuro-pneumonia was, indeed, contagious. An unusual feature of Lyman’s published report was a thematic map showing that the epizootic appeared only in contiguous counties on the Atlantic seaboard. This added visual proof, or so Lyman thought, that the country was, indeed, facing a contagious disease. In 1879 and 1880 Lyman traveled to Great Britain and—by examination—became a member (1879) and then a fellow (1880) of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London)....

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Moore, Veranus Alva (13 April 1859–11 February 1931), veterinary pathologist and bacteriologist, was born in Houndsfield, Jefferson County, New York, the son of Alva Moore, who farmed and worked on the Lehigh Valley railroad, and Antoinette Eastman. When Moore was thirteen years old his father died of malaria and left the family in financial straits. Moore interrupted his education to work on a farm and contribute to the family’s support. A farm mishap at age fourteen in which he stepped on a nail led to a serious bone infection that required periodic hospitalization for the next ten years. Moore used crutches until he was twenty-five years old....

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Pearson, Leonard (17 August 1868–20 September 1909), veterinary educator, bacteriologist, and sanitarian, was born in Evansville, Indiana, the son of Leonard Pearson, an assistant superintendent of the Evansville and Crawfordsville Railroad, and Lucy Small Jones. He studied veterinary medicine at Cornell University with renowned veterinarian ...

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Salmon, Daniel Elmer (23 July 1850–30 August 1914), veterinarian, was born in Mount Olive, New Jersey, the son of Daniel Landon Salmon and Eleanor Flock, farmers. He attended the Mount Olive district school, the nearby Chester Institute, and Eastman Business College before entering Cornell University in 1868 with its first class. There he studied with ...

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Williams, Walter Long (26 February 1856–23 October 1945), veterinarian, scientist, and educator, was born on a farm near Argenta, Illinois, the son of Jackson Williams and Lavina Long, farmers. He attended Illinois Industrial University (now the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) from January 1875 until June 1877. Studying in the School of Agriculture, he took veterinary courses for farmers taught by Frederick W. Prentice, and therein found his life’s work. Leaving the university because he could no longer afford it, he worked on his father’s farm until the fall of 1878, when he left to study at the Montreal Veterinary College (MVC). There he encountered Duncan McEachran, a pioneering veterinary educator, and ...