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Giannini, Attilio Henry (02 March 1874–07 February 1943), physician, banker, and motion picture executive, was born in San Jose, California, the son of Italian immigrants Luigi Giannini and Virginia Demartini, farmers and ranchers. After the fatal shooting of his father by a disgruntled employee in August 1876, Giannini’s mother took over management of their Alviso, California, farm. She married Lorenzo Scatena, and in June 1880 the family moved to San Francisco. While Scatena developed a wholesale produce business, L. Scatena & Co., Giannini attended Washington Grammar School in North Beach....

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Schoop, Trudi (09 October 1903–14 July 1999), mime and dance and movement therapist, was born Gertrude Schoop in Zurich, Switzerland, the daughter of Friedrich Maximilian Schoop, a newspaper editor and president of Dolder Hotels, and Emma Olga Böppli Schoop, a freethinker who was uninterested in the conventions of the time. All three of Schoop's siblings were artistic. Max became a painter, Paul later wrote the scores for Trudi's dances, and Hedi was a dancer, actress, ceramist, and painter. Their home was always open to artists and intellectuals. Trudi, brought up in this free-wheeling environment, suffered mightily the rigidity of school in Zurich....

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Stein, Jules Caesar (26 April 1896–29 April 1981), entertainment executive and physician, was born in South Bend, Indiana, the son of Louis M. Stein and Rosa Cohen. His extraordinary achievements began in the classroom. A student at West Virginia University while still in his early teens, he graduated from the University of Chicago at the age of nineteen. His medical degree was earned at Rush Medical College, Chicago, in 1921. He acquired a specialty in ophthalmology at the Eye Clinic of the University of Vienna and first practiced this as chief resident in ophthalmology at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and subsequently in an affiliation with Dr. Harry Gradle, also of Chicago. His depth of knowledge is revealed in “Telescopic Spectacles and Magnifiers as Aids to Poor Vision” (1924), which quickly became the definitive manual in this specialty....