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Caray, Harry (14 March 1914?–18 February 1998), baseball broadcaster, was born Harry Christopher Carabina in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Christopher Carabina and Daisy Argint. Although most sources claim 1 March, in either 1919 or 1920, as his birthdate, Caray's birth certificate, examined by the ...

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Dizzy Dean Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-29523).

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Dean, Dizzy (16 January 1910–17 July 1974), baseball player, coach, and broadcaster, was born Jay Hanna Dean in Lucas, Arkansas, the son of Albert Dean and Alma Nelson, both migrant workers. “Dizzy,” a nickname he acquired from his zany antics, had a younger brother, Paul, who also pitched in the major leagues. There has been some uncertainty about Dean’s birthdate, birthplace, and baptismal name. According to Dean, the biographical confusion might stem from the fact that he liked to give every reporter a scoop. Dean said his other name, Jerome Herman, was adopted when he was seven years old. A playmate by that name died, and to console the boy’s father, Dean said that he would take the youth’s name as his own....

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Heilmann, Harry Edwin (03 August 1894–09 July 1951), baseball player and announcer, was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Richard Heilmann, a German-immigrant ironworker, and Mary McVeigh. Raised in the Roman Catholic faith, Heilmann attended parochial schools until 1911, when he dropped out of Sacred Heart College, the preparatory school for St. Mary’s College of California, after flunking mathematics and failing to make the varsity baseball team. While working as a bookkeeper for the National Biscuit Company, Heilmann started playing baseball for a semiprofessional club at Hanford, California. He was signed by a scout for Portland Oregon, in the Northwest League, where he showed a great deal of professional promise as an outfielder-first baseman. At the end of the 1913 season the Detroit Tigers of the American League (AL) purchased his contract. Paid $2,100 for the 1914 season, Heilmann appeared in 66 games and batted only .225. When he turned down the same amount in 1915, Detroit assigned him to San Francisco in the Pacific Coast League, where he batted a lusty .364....

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Lindstrom, Freddy (21 November 1905–04 October 1981), baseball player, manager, announcer, and coach, was born Frederick Anthony Lindstrom in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Frederick Lindstrom, a plumbing contractor, and Mary Sweeney. (His middle name was changed to Charles later on.) At Tilden High School and then at Loyola Academy, Lindstrom starred as an infielder and batter. In 1922 ...

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Rizzuto, Phil (25 September 1917–13 August 2007), baseball player and broadcaster, was born Fiero Francis Rizzuto (he later legally changed his first name to Philip) in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Brooklyn natives Fiore, a trolley conductor, and Rose Angotti Rizzuto. The family, New York to the core, moved to Queens when Phil was twelve. A star baseball player at Richmond Hill High School, Phil tried out with the local Giants and Dodgers, his favorite team, at sixteen but failed to make an impression. The other New York team, the Yankees, signed him in 1936 and he began to work his way up through the Yankee farm system, spending a year at Bassett, Virginia, in 1937, moving to Norfolk in 1938, and then Kansas City in 1939 and 1940. At each stop in this journey he batted over .300. In Kansas City he also picked up his lifetime nickname, “Scooter,” as teammate Billy Hitchcock, observing the speedy but short-legged Rizzuto's running style, told him that he did not run, he scooted. He was named the top minor league player in baseball that final year in Kansas City....

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Wilkinson, Bud (23 April 1916–09 February 1994), college football coach, sports commentator, and politician, was born Charles Burnham Wilkinson in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Charles Patton Wilkinson, a successful mortgage broker, and Edith Lindbloom Wilkinson, who died when Bud was seven years old. After his mother’s death, Bud attended the Shattuck Military Academy in Faribault, Minnesota. He thrived at the school and quickly became a standout student and athlete. He graduated in 1933....