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Davenport, Thomas (09 July 1802–06 July 1851), blacksmith and inventor, was born near Williamstown, Vermont, the son of Daniel Davenport and Hannah Rice, farmers. Eighth in a family of eleven children, Davenport had little formal schooling. The premature death of his father during the winter of 1812 from “spotted fever” left the family to fend for itself. At age fourteen Davenport was apprenticed to a Williamstown blacksmith. Under the terms of his indenture, he was allowed to attend school for six weeks every winter and was given room and board. Davenport completed his apprenticeship at the age of twenty-one and set up a smithy in Brandon, Vermont. He married Emily Goss, the daughter of a prosperous farmer, in 1827; they had two sons....

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Deere, John (07 February 1804–17 May 1886), manufacturer, was born in Rutland, Vermont, the son of William Rinhold Deere, a tailor, and Sarah Yates, a seamstress. His formal schooling was limited, and he became an apprentice blacksmith at age seventeen. He worked for several blacksmiths in Vermont before opening his own shop while in his mid-twenties. Deere’s craftsmanship was highly regarded, but his luck was bad and his businesses failed. So in 1836 he left behind his pregnant wife, Demarius Lamb (whom he had married in 1827), and four young children (they eventually had nine) and joined the westward movement, heading for Grand Detour, Illinois. His family followed him the next year....

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Jefferson, Isaac ( December 1775–1850), enslaved blacksmith, was born at “Monticello” in Virginia, the son of George, a foreman and overseer, and Ursula, a pastrycook and laundress. In 1773 Thomas Jefferson purchased Isaac’s parents from two different owners in Powhatan County. George rose from foreman of labor to become, in 1797, overseer of Monticello—the only slave to reach that position. Ursula, who had been a “favorite house woman” of ...

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Richard J. Wattenmaker

Yellin, Samuel (02 March 1885–03 October 1940), metalsmith, was born in Mogilev, in the province of Galicia, Poland, the son of Zacharias Yellin, a lawyer, and Kate Weintraub. Apprenticed at around age twelve to a blacksmith, Yellin became a master by seventeen. From about 1901 to 1905 he traveled and worked in ornamental metal workshops in Germany, Belgium, and England. In 1906 Yellin immigrated to Philadelphia, where from 1907 to 1919 he taught a course in wrought iron at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. By 1909 he had established a small shop in Philadelphia and was showing examples of his ironwork designs to architects such as ...