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Logan, James (20 October 1674–31 October 1751), provincial councilor, scholar, and William Penn's secretary in America, provincial councilor, scholar, and William Penn’s secretary in America, was born in Lurgan, County Armaugh, Ireland, the son of Scottish Quakers Patrick Logan, a minister and teacher, and Isabel Hume. His father, who earned an A.M. from Edinburgh University, taught him Latin, Greek, and Hebrew, and at age thirteen he was apprenticed to Edward Webb, a Quaker linen draper in Dublin. Logan returned to Lurgan six months later, then moved with his family to Bristol when his father was appointed master of the Friar Meetinghouse School. He replaced his father in this position in 1693 and later earned the respect of William Penn when the colonial proprietor served on the school’s supervisory board. Penn invited Logan to be his secretary in Pennsylvania, and he was with the Penn family aboard the ...

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Rich, Obadiah (1783–20 January 1850), diplomat and book dealer, was born in Truro, Massachusetts, the son of Obadiah Rich, a ship captain, and Salome Lombard. About 1789 his family moved to the Boston area, where Rich resided until 1816. Although the details of Rich’s schooling are not known, an acquaintance described him as “a gentleman by birth and education” and “really learned” (Henry Harrisse, ...

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Shaw, William Smith (12 August 1778–25 April 1826), bibliophile, lawyer, and presidential secretary, was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, the son of the Reverend John Shaw, a minister, and Elizabeth Smith. Accident-prone in youth, Shaw also suffered his entire life from chronic febrile and rheumatic complaints. He was, however, bookish at an early age, having acquired a classical taste from his father, who supplemented his income by preparing young men for college....

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Warden, David Bailie (1772–09 October 1845), diplomat and scholar, was born in Ballycastle, County Down, Ireland, the son of Robert Warden (occupation unknown) and Elizabeth Bailie. He was educated for the Presbyterian ministry and also took some medical training, receiving a certificate in midwifery. He received his master of arts from the University of Glasgow in 1797. He became involved with the United Irishmen through his friendship with Theobald Wolfe Tone and was arrested in 1798. In lieu of trial, Warden was offered banishment from Ireland. He emigrated to the United States in 1799. Instead of pursuing a life as a clergyman, Warden, who had a broad interest in mathematics, science, and literature, went into teaching. He became the principal of the Columbia Academy in Kinderhook, New York, and later, in 1801, became the head tutor in nearby Kingston Academy....