1-13 of 13 results  for:

Clear all

Image

Otto Bettmann Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Article

Bettmann, Otto (15 October 1903–01 May 1998), historian and photo archivist, was born in Leipzig, Germany, to Hans Bettmann, an orthopedic surgeon, and his wife, Charlotte Frank. The family was Jewish, and Otto grew up in a highly cultured environment, where he was especially drawn to his father's extensive collection of medical literature. As a child he enjoyed working in the darkroom of the elder Bettmann's clinic, where Hans Bettmann pioneered in the use of X-rays for diagnosis. Young Otto made copies of pictorial images he found in his father's books and collected from free publications offered by German medical firms, and in 1916, for his father's birthday, he presented a pictorial history of medicine that he had created from these images....

Article

Candler, Allen Daniel (04 November 1834–26 October 1910), politician and compiler of records, was born in Auraria, Georgia, the son of Daniel Gill Candler and Nancy Caroline Matthews, farmers. Candler worked on the family farm, taught school, and attended Mercer University, where he earned an A.B. in 1859 and an M.A. in 1866. During the Civil War he served in the Confederate Army of Tennessee. A wound in 1864 resulted in the loss of one eye. That same year he married Eugenia Thomas Williams; they would have eleven children. At the war’s end he said, “I counted myself quite wealthy [with] … one wife, and baby, one eye, and one silver dollar.”...

Article

Connor, Robert Digges Wimberly (26 September 1878–25 February 1950), first archivist of the United States, was born in Wilson, North Carolina, the son of Henry Groves Connor, a state legislator and judge, and Kate Whitfield. Connor attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and received a Ph.B. in 1899. He taught high school in Winston-Salem (1899–1901) and then became a high school principal within the North Carolina public school system (1902–1904). In 1904 Connor accepted appointment as executive secretary of the Educational Campaign for North Carolina (1904–1907) and subsequently became secretary of the new North Carolina Historical Commission (1907–1921). The commission was charged with developing an archival program within the state, and Connor modeled his program on those that had recently been established in Alabama (1901) and Mississippi (1903)....

Article

Fitzpatrick, John Clement (10 August 1876–10 February 1940), archivist, was born in Washington, D.C., the son of James Nicholas Fitzpatrick, a financial clerk of the U.S. Senate, and Elizabeth Ann Combs. He graduated from Washington High School in 1894 and for three years worked as a journalist for the ...

Article

Knight, Lucian Lamar (09 February 1868–19 November 1933), editor, archivist, and historian, was born in Atlanta, Georgia, the son of Confederate general George Walton Knight, a lawyer and cotton merchant, and his second wife, Clara Corinne Daniel, a teacher. Named for Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar...

Image

Waldo Gifford Leland Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-105695).

Article

Leland, Waldo Gifford (17 July 1879–19 October 1966), historian and archival theorist, was born in Newton, Massachusetts, the son of Luther Erving Leland and Ellen Maria Gifford, public school teachers. Leland attended Newton High School and Brown University, graduating with a B.A. in sociology in 1900. While at Brown he studied with history professor ...

Article

McAvoy, Thomas Timothy (12 September 1903–05 July 1969), priest, archivist, and historian, was born in Tipton, Indiana, the son of Charles Edward McAvoy, a merchant, and Nora Bernardine Walsh. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1925, made final profession of vows in the Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) that same year, and was ordained a priest in 1929. He taught high school Latin and English from 1929 to 1932, offered courses in American history at Notre Dame from 1933 to 1935, and received a Ph.D. in history from Columbia University in 1940. He was appointed university archivist at Notre Dame in 1929, chairman of the department of history ten years later, and managing editor of the ...

Article

Rhees, William Jones (13 March 1830–18 March 1907), government administrator and archivist, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Benjamin Rush Rhees, a physician, and Margaret Grace Evans. Rhees’s grandfather, the Reverend Morgan J. Rhees, had come to America from Wales, and his father was a direct descendant also of Benjamin Rush, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. Rhees’s mother’s forebears included Evan Evans, a colonel of militia in the Revolution, and John Lukens, a member of the commission appointed in 1781 for the extension of the Mason-Dixon Line....

Article

Rowland, Dunbar (25 August 1864–01 November 1937), archivist, was born near Oakland in north-central Mississippi, the youngest son of William Brewer Rowland, a physician whose father had brought his family from Virginia to Mississippi in 1840, and Mary Judith Bryan of Yalobusha County, Mississippi, where the couple settled. Rowland had private primary schooling in Memphis, Tennessee, and received high school preparation at Oakland Academy. At age eighteen he matriculated at the new A&M College in Starkville, where he was one of eleven B.S. graduates in 1886. He completed a law degree at the University of Mississippi in 1888 and returned to Memphis to practice law for five years then moved his practice to Coffeeville near Oakland, where his brothers were also settled, in 1893. While practicing law Rowland made a local name for himself as a writer of historical and biographical vignettes for newspapers....

Article

Schellenberg, Theodore Roosevelt (24 February 1903–14 January 1970), archivist, was born in Harvey County, Kansas, the son of Abraham Schellenberg and Sarah Schroeder, farmers. The family had moved to Kansas as part of the large German Mennonite immigration there, and Abraham Schellenberg later served as director of the national Mennonite Brethren Publishing House. After briefly attending Tabor College, Schellenberg was graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Kansas in 1928, and he received an M.A. in history there in 1930. He earned a Ph.D. in history from the University of Pennsylvania in 1934. He married Alma Groening in 1929; they had two children....

Article

Stantial, Edna Lamprey (22 Feb. 1897–10 Mar. 1985), suffragist, archivist of the women’s suffrage movement, and women’s rights activist, was born Edna Frances Lamprey in Reading, Massachusetts, the daughter of Frank and Mollie McClelland Stantial. She grew up in nearby Melrose, graduated from Melrose High School in ...