1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • educational reformer x
  • Manufacture and trade x
Clear all

Image

Pierre S. du Pont. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-103865).

Article

du Pont, Pierre Samuel (15 January 1870–05 April 1954), industrialist and educational reformer, was born at “Nemours,” on the Brandywine Creek near Wilmington, Delaware, the son of Lammot du Pont and Mary Belin. He was named for his great-great-grandfather Pierre Samuel du Pont de Nemours, the French physiocrat who fled revolutionary France in 1799. His father, second in command of the family powder-making firm during the long reign of ...

Article

Gould, Benjamin Apthorp (15 June 1787–24 October 1859), educator and merchant, was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts, the son of Benjamin Gould and Griselda (or Grizzel) Apthorp Flagg. Gould’s father was a veteran of the revolutionary war who was reduced to poverty in its aftermath. The family relocated in 1800 to Newburyport, Massachusetts, where Gould spent his youth. He attended Dummer Academy in Newbury, Massachusetts, and apparently also taught school in order to earn money for college. At last able to enter Harvard College at the age of twenty-three, he proved an excellent student, demonstrating particular proficiency in Latin and Greek. His progress was such that in April 1814, before his scheduled graduation, he was offered the position of principal of the Boston Public Latin School....

Article

Hazard, Thomas Robinson (03 January 1797–26 March 1886), manufacturer and reformer, was born in South Kingstown, Rhode Island, the son of Rowland Hazard, a manufacturer and merchant, and Mary Peace. Hazard’s father established the Peace Dale Manufacturing Company, the first water-powered wool-carding and fulling mill in South Kingstown, about 1802, on the site of an eighteenth-century fulling mill. By 1814 the company had expanded to include spinning and perhaps the earliest power loom-weaving in the state. After limited formal education at Westtown in Pennsylvania, and after training in mill management and operations at the growing enterprise, Hazard worked in the family’s woolen business between 1813 and 1842....

Article

Malkiel, Theresa Serber (01 May 1874–17 November 1949), trade union leader, woman suffragist, publicist, and educator, was born in Bar, Russia. In 1891 she emigrated with her parents to the United States.

Soon after her arrival, Theresa Serber became a pioneer in the Jewish workers’ movement and socialist labor agitation in New York City. Employed in the garment industry, she joined the Russian Workingmen’s Club in 1892. In October 1894 she was among a group of seventy women who founded the Infant Cloak Makers Union (ICMU). Although it was a depression year, she and her associates decided not to accept wage cuts and deteriorating labor conditions any longer. Their action was front-page news. Eventually the ICMU became part of the Socialist Trades and Labor Alliance. In 1896, Serber was among the delegates to the first convention of the latter alliance; in 1899, along with many others, she broke with labor leader ...