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Bradford, John (06 June 1749–20 March 1830), first printer in Kentucky, was born in Prince William (later Fauquier) County, Virginia, the son of Daniel Bradford, a surveyor for Fauquier County, and Alice Morgan. He was one of eleven children in a family that probably also farmed. Bradford’s father taught him the craft of surveying. In 1771 John Bradford married Eliza James; they had five sons and four daughters....

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Nash, John Henry (12 March 1871–24 May 1947), printer, bibliophile, and typographer, was born in Woodbridge, Ontario, Canada, the son of John Marvin Nash, a mechanical engineer, and Catherine Cain. Though withdrawn from public school at age sixteen to begin his practical education by learning his father’s trade, Nash insisted on becoming a printer. He began his career in 1888 with an apprenticeship at James Murray and Company, a Toronto printing firm. Despite his thorough training and seeming determination to become a printer, Nash left the business after a few years and embarked on the life of a bicycle racer. A major fad in the 1890s, bicycle racing offered the opportunity for wealth and fame, and both appealed to him. He traveled the racing circuit from around 1890 to 1892, when his passion for the sport waned and he decided to go back to printing. Nash returned to Toronto to work for Brough and Caswell and then for Milne-Burgham Company, where he remained until 1894. In the winter of 1894 he left Toronto to work for App-Stotts in Denver, Colorado; he stayed there a mere four months, after which he relocated to San Francisco....

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Timothy, Lewis (?– December 1738), printer and librarian, was born Lewis Timothée, probably in the Netherlands, of Huguenot parents (names unknown) who had fled France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. His wife Elizabeth Timothy (maiden name unknown) was almost certainly educated in Holland, and by the time of their arrival in Philadelphia from Rotterdam in 1731, the couple had been married long enough to have four children, aged nine and under. At the time of Timothy’s death he had six living children, and his wife was pregnant with another. Timothy settled in Philadelphia where, on 21 September 1731, he took the oath of allegiance to the British Crown. Fluent in several languages, he soon advertised that he would instruct students in French. Working as a journeyman printer for ...