1-20 of 42 results  for:

  • Sports, games, and pastimes x
Clear all

Article

Anderson, Willie (1878?–25 October 1910), golfer, was born William Anderson in North Berwick, Scotland, the son of Tom Anderson, a golf greenskeeper. (His mother’s name is unknown.) His birth year has appeared as 1878 and 1880; most obituaries list his age as 30 at his death. Anderson grew up in North Berwick, spending much of his youth on the golf course of the club where his father was employed. He never worked as a caddie but focused on playing golf and learning the required skills. He came to the United States in 1894 when golf was being introduced as a recreation and sport. In his first tournament, the U.S. Open in 1897, he finished one stroke behind the winner, Joe Lloyd. He also fared well in the 1898 and 1899 opens, finishing third and fifth....

Article

Armour, Tommy (24 September 1895–11 September 1968), professional golfer, was born Thomas Dickson Armour in Edinburgh, Scotland, the son of George Armour, a confectioner. His mother’s name is unknown. His father died when Armour was four. Armour’s older brother, Sandy, took the young child to a golf course adjacent to their house and introduced him to the game of golf. As an adolescent, Armour caddied for Sandy as he won the Scottish Amateur championship. After entering Stewart’s College in Edinburgh, Armour graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 1914....

Image

Tom Armour. Defeating Harry Cooper to win the U.S. golf title. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-108418).

Article

Barnes, James Martin (08 April 1886–25 May 1966), professional golfer, was born in Lelant, Cornwall, England. His parents’ names are unknown. As a boy he was an apprentice and then assistant professional golfer at the West Cornwall Golf Club. He immigrated to the United States in 1906 and took up residence in San Francisco. Later he became a naturalized citizen, although he frequently returned to his homeland to play in the British Open championship....

Image

Patricia Jane Berg. Watercolour on paper, 1980, by Dick Dugan. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Article

Berg, Patricia Jane (13 February 1918–10 September 2006), professional golfer, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the third of four children in a strongly Catholic family. Patty, who attended John Brown Elementary School, was a self-confessed tomboy and excellent all-around athlete (particularly speed skating). She turned to golf after her mother objected to constant bruises and torn dresses following neighborhood football games with boys....

Article

Browne, Mary Kendall (03 June 1891–19 August 1971), tennis player and golfer, was born in Ventura County, California, the daughter of Albert William Browne, a rancher and Spanish-American War captain, and Neotia Rice. She attended Los Angeles (Calif.) Polytechnic High School. Her older brother Nathaniel Borrodail Browne, an excellent tennis competitor, taught Mary a sound all-court style and sharpened her volleying and smashing skills in practice by stationing her at the net to parry his hardest drives....

Article

Collett, Glenna (20 June 1903–03 February 1989), champion golfer, was born in New Haven, Connecticut, the daughter of George H. Collett, a life insurance agent, and Ada Wilkinson. Collett, the leading woman golfer in the United States in the 1920s and early 1930s, became interested in golf as a teenager accompanying her father on a course in Providence, Rhode Island. At fourteen she took her first lessons from John Anderson of the Metacomel Club in Providence; he helped her develop the rhythmic swing that was her hallmark. Later, she received instruction from ...

Article

Demaret, Jimmy (24 May 1910–28 December 1983), professional golfer, was born James Newton Demaret in Houston, Texas, the son of John O’Brien Demaret, a carpenter; his mother’s name is unknown. He grew up in Houston, began caddying at the age of eight, and won his first competitive tournament three years later in 1923. Demaret completed two years of high school before starting his professional golf career. He married a redhead named Idella Adams, and the couple had a daughter....

Image

Babe Didrikson Competing in the first heat of the 80-meter hurdles, winning in a record-breaking 11.8 seconds, at the Los Angeles Olympics, 1932. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-113281).

Article

Didrikson, Babe (26 June 1914?–27 September 1956), athlete, was born Mildred Ella Didriksen in Port Arthur, Texas, the daughter of Ole Nickolene Didriksen, a ship’s carpenter and cabinetmaker, and Hannah Marie Olsen, an accomplished skater and skier. Didrikson herself was later to change the last syllable of the surname from - ...

Article

Diegel, Leo H. (27 April 1899–08 May 1951), professional golfer, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of William G. Diegel, an industrial worker, and Elizabeth Kebbe. As a ten-year-old parochial school student he began caddying and became something of a teenage phenomenon. At age thirteen he won the city caddy championship, and four years later, as an assistant professional at the Country Club of Detroit, he won the Michigan Open title. He rose to national prominence in 1920 when he tied for second place, behind Englishman Ted Ray, in the U.S. Open at Inverness Country Club in Toledo, Ohio. This event proved to be a turning point in American golf. It marked the end of British dominance in major tournaments and the emergence of American professionals such as Diegel, ...

Image

Chick Evans. [left to right] Frank Kellogg, Warren G. Harding, Chick Evans, and Henry P. Fletcher. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-96909).

Article

Evans, Chick (18 July 1890–06 November 1979), golfer, was born Charles Evans, Jr., in Indianapolis, Indiana, the son of Charles Evans, a librarian, and Mary (maiden name unknown). When Evans was three, the family moved to Chicago. After attending public schools there, he entered Northwestern University in 1909, completing two years of study before leaving because of financial problems....

Article

Ghezzi, Vic (19 October 1910–30 May 1976), professional golfer, was born Victor J. Ghezzi in Rumson, New Jersey, the son of Frank Ghezzi, a gardener, and Rose Zanelli. Ghezzi, who attended public schools in Red Bank, New Jersey, and graduated from Red Bank High School, followed a traditional path to a professional career. After first caddying at the Rumson Country Club, he worked in the pro shop and finally became the head professional....

Image

Althea Gibson. Watercolor and pencil on board, 1957, by Boris Chaliapin. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Time magazine.

Article

Gibson, Althea (25 August 1927–28 September 2003), tennis player and professional golfer, was born in Silver, South Carolina, to Daniel Gibson and Annie Bell Gibson, sharecroppers. In 1930 the family moved from the rural South to the urban North, relocating in Harlem, where her three sisters and brother were born. Althea frequently skipped school and repeatedly ran away from home, and this resulted in regular whippings from her father. Feisty and determined, Althea preferred to spend her time in bowling alleys and pool halls. Althea was an outstanding all-around athlete—she played any kind of ball sport, excelling at paddle tennis and basketball. A self-described tomboy, Althea also played football, and her father taught her how to box, a skill she used to navigate recurrent assaults from boys and girls....

Article

Guldahl, Ralph (22 November 1911–12 June 1987), professional golfer, was born in Dallas, Texas, the son of Olaf Guldahl and Anna Nordly, Norwegian immigrants. He became a caddy at the Lakewood Country Club at age eleven and then began playing regularly at the nine-hole Randall Park city course. In 1927 he captained the state champion Woodrow Wilson High School team and was also the individual interscholastic medalist with rounds of 65 and 71. He developed his game in the highly competitive atmosphere of the Tenison Park and Stevens Park public courses against Ray Mangrum, Gus Moreland, and other strong competition. He entered various Texas tournaments, whose fields included ...

Image

Walter Hagen, c. 1908–1914. Right, with a friend. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-100346).

Article

Hagen, Walter Charles (21 December 1892–05 October 1969), professional golfer, was born in Rochester, New York, the son of William Hagen, a blacksmith, and Louise Balko. Hagen grew up less than a mile from the Country Club of Rochester, in the Corbett’s Glen neighborhood of suburban Brighton. The proximity to a golf course was instrumental to Hagen’s early development. He began playing golf at age five; by the age of seven he was caddying for 10 cents an hour. Hagan quit attending school regularly at the age of 12, as he jumped out of a schoolroom window, headed for the golf course....