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Peck, Annie Smith (19 October 1850–18 July 1935), mountaineer, author, and feminist, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the youngest of four children of Anna Power Smith Peck and George Bacheler Peck. Her father was a lawyer, a legislator, and a merchant, affording Peck a comfortable early life. But she yearned to have the same education afforded her brothers and wanted, like them, to attend Brown University but could not because she was a woman. Instead she attended Rhode Island State Normal School (now Rhode Island College), a preparatory school for teachers, graduating in 1872. Despite her parents’ disapproval Peck next enrolled in the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, which had just begun to admit women, graduating in 1878 with a degree in classical languages. She traveled to Athens to become the first woman to attend the American School of Classical Studies and in 1881 received a master’s degree specializing in Greek from the University of Michigan. From 1881 to 1892 she was a professor of Latin at Purdue University and at Smith College, making her one of the first American women college professors. When she realized she could support herself lecturing about archaeology and mountaineering, illustrated by her own photographs, she quit teaching. She never married....

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Washburn, Bradford (7 June 1910–10 Jan. 2007), mountaineer, photographer, cartographer, and museum director, was born Henry Bradford Washburn, Jr. in Cambridge, Massachusetts, into a family that traced its roots to Plymouth Colony. His father, Henry Bradford Washburn, Sr., was the dean of the Episcopal Divinity School; his mother, Edith Buckingham Hall, was an amateur photographer and the widow of Rev. Samuel Colgate. In addition to a younger brother, Sherwood, born in ...

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Workman, Fanny Bullock (08 January 1859–22 January 1925), travel writer and mountain climber, was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, the daughter of Alexander Hamilton Bullock, a Republican politician and one-term governor of Massachusetts, and Elvira Hazard. Her mother was one of three surviving children of Augustus George Hazard, wealthy landowner and cofounder of Hazard Powder Company (one of the most prominent manufacturers of gunpowder in the mid-nineteenth century). Raised in affluence, Fanny Bullock was privately tutored during her early childhood. As an adolescent, she completed her education at finishing schools in New York City, Paris, and Dresden. She returned to the family home in Worcester at the age of twenty and met William Hunter Workman, a Yale-educated physician who was twelve years her senior. In 1881 she married Workman, with whom she had one child....