1-2 of 2 results  for:

  • immigration reform advocate x
  • Education and scholarship x
Clear all

Article

Kohler, Max James (22 May 1871–24 July 1934), jurist, historian, and Jewish communal worker, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Kaufmann Kohler and Johanna Einhorn. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Germany, and both his father and grandfather, David Einhorn, were leading rabbis of the Reform Movement in American Judaism. Upon the death of Kohler’s grandfather in 1879, his father assumed Einhorn’s pulpit at New York’s Congregation Beth El, and the family moved to that city. There he grew up in an atmosphere infused with a devotion to both religious values and scholarly pursuits. After completing high school, Kohler attended the College of the City of New York, where he won several important literary prizes. Following his graduation in 1890, he entered Columbia University, from which he received both M.A. (1891) and LL.B. (1893) degrees. He was admitted to the New York State bar in 1893 and became an assistant U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, resigning after four years to start a private law practice. In 1906 he married Winifred Lichtenauer, who died in 1922. No children resulted from the marriage....

Article

Roberts, Peter (26 August 1859–02 December 1932), minister, sociologist, and educator, was born in Dowlais, South Wales, Great Britain, the son of John Roberts and Elizabeth Davis Roberts. Information about his early life is extremely limited. According to one source, Roberts worked as a coal miner and as a blacksmith's apprentice in his youth. He went to school at Glangadog, South Wales, and received his B.A. at Brecon Memorial College, Wales, in 1883. In the same year, Roberts immigrated to the United States, where he attended Yale University. Graduating with a bachelor of divinity degree in 1886, he delivered the commencement address....