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Berry, Edward Wilber (10 February 1875–20 September 1945), paleobotanist, teacher, and university administrator, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Abijah Conger Berry and Anna Wilber. Berry is a classic example of the self-trained scientist. He received elementary courses in biology and botany in high school that roused his interest in nature. Berry completed the three-year course in two years and finished his formal education at thirteen. From 1890 to 1897 he worked for a cotton goods company, rising from stock boy to traveling salesman. Berry then entered the newspaper world as business manager for the ...

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Eaton, Amos (17 May 1776–10 May 1842), geologist, botanist, and educational reformer, was born in Chatham, New York, the son of Azubah Hurd and Abel Eaton, farmers. In 1790 Eaton went to Duanesburgh, New York, to live with a relative, Russell Beebe, who taught him land surveying. A blacksmith by trade, Beebe helped Eaton manufacture his own surveying instruments. From 1791 to 1795, Eaton studied the classics under private tutors in Chatham and nearby Hillsdale. He entered Williams College in 1795 and graduated in 1799. Also in 1799, Eaton began to study law in Spencertown, New York, and married Polly Thomas. They had one child before Polly died in 1802. The earliest hint of Eaton’s promise as an educator was realized with the publication of his surveying manual, ...

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Kremers, Edward (23 February 1865–09 July 1941), pharmaceutical educator and phytochemist, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Gerhard Kremers, a secretary-treasurer of the Milwaukee Gas & Light Company, and Elise Kamper. German culture and education were dominant influences that shaped Kremers’s life and career. To escape the events in Germany in 1848 his family immigrated to one of the most Germanic parts of the United States. In elementary school, all but two or three of Edward’s peers were studying German. His high school, operated by the German Reformed church, was modeled after a German secondary school. After graduation in 1882, Kremers apprenticed in Milwaukee with an immigrant German pharmacist, Louis Lotz. After a two-year apprenticeship Kremers studied at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy for a year (1884–1885); he then enrolled in the University of Wisconsin to earn a Ph.G. certificate (1886) and a B.S. degree (1888)....

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Pease, Arthur Stanley (22 September 1881–07 January 1964), classicist, college president, and botanist, was born in Somers, Connecticut, the son of Theodore Claudius Pease, a Congregationalist minister, and Abby Frances Cutter. Pease graduated from Harvard summa cum laude in 1902, receiving the M.A. in 1903 and the Ph.D. in 1905. He studied at the American School of Classical Studies in Rome (1905–1906) and taught at Harvard (1906–1909) before moving to the University of Illinois as assistant professor of classics. He married Henrietta Faxon in 1909 and had one child. Pease rose to professor of classics and curator of the university’s museum of classical art and archaeology. Early in his career he demonstrated his preference for writing works of reference rather than analysis: at Illinois he collaborated on an ...