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Bronk, Detlev Wulf (13 August 1897–17 November 1975), biophysicist, was born in New York City, the son of Mitchell Bronk, a Baptist minister, and Mary Wulf. Bronk’s family moved to Bayonne, New Jersey, in 1900, and Bronk received his early education there. From 1912 until 1919 he lived in Troy, New York, graduating from high school in 1915. He then enrolled at Swarthmore College....

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Cole, Kenneth Stewart (10 July 1900–18 April 1984), biophysicist, was born in Ithaca, New York, the son of Charles Nelson Cole, an educator, and Mabel Stewart. Known in later years by colleagues and friends as Kacy, Cole described his childhood as lonely. He grew up in the intellectually challenging environment of college towns, and his mother encouraged his scientific curiosity. In 1917 Cole entered Oberlin College, where his father was a dean. His sophomore year was interrupted for a brief period of army service at the end of 1918. During the summer months of 1920 and 1921 and a year’s leave of absence (1921–1922), Cole worked at the General Electric Research Laboratory in Schenectady, New York. After receiving his A.B. in physics in 1922, Cole chose to pursue graduate studies in physics at Cornell, where he studied with ...

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Hartline, Haldan Keffer (22 December 1903–18 March 1983), biophysicist, was born in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, the son of Daniel Schollenberger Hartline, a teacher in the natural sciences at Bloomsburg State Normal School, and Harriet Franklin Keffer, a teacher of English at the normal school. Hartline referred to his father as his “first and best teacher.” The love of nature that his father instilled in him strongly influenced his choice of experimental research in biology as a lifelong career. In 1920 Hartline spent the summer studying comparative anatomy at the marine laboratory in Cold Spring Harbor, Long Island. That fall he entered Lafayette College. Hartline spent the summer of 1923 at the marine laboratory at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, where the eminent biologist ...

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Hecht, Selig (08 February 1892–18 September 1947), physiologist and biophysicist, was born in the village of Glogow, in what was then Austrian Poland, the son of Mandel Hecht and Mary Mresse. His family emigrated in 1898, settling in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, where Mandel Hecht worked as a foreman in the men’s clothing industry. Selig attended both local public schools and Hebrew school, also studying Hebrew at home under his father’s tutelage. He worked as a bookkeeper throughout his high school and college years to help support himself....