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Adams, William (25 January 1807–31 August 1880), minister and seminary president, was born in Colchester, Connecticut, the son of John Adams, an educator, and Elizabeth Ripley. Adams grew up in Andover, Massachusetts, where his father was the principal of Phillips Academy. He entered Yale College in 1824, where he received his A.B. in 1827. After college he returned home to study at Andover Theological Seminary and to assist his father in teaching. He completed his seminary training in 1830 and was ordained a Congregational minister. He began service as the pastor of a church in Brighton, Massachusetts, in 1831. He married Susan P. Magoun in July 1831. His wife’s illness forced him to resign from the Brighton pastorate in early 1834, but following her death in May, he accepted a ministerial call to the Broome Street (later Central) Presbyterian Church in New York City. Since the Congregational and Presbyterian denominations then enjoyed a spirit of mutual respect and cooperation, Adams switched denominations and was installed as pastor in November 1834. In August 1835 he married Martha B. Magoun, the sister of his first wife....

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Caulkins, Frances Manwaring (26 April 1795–03 February 1869), author, was born in New London, Connecticut, the daughter of Joshua Caulkins, a seagoing trader who died in Haiti before her birth, and Fanny Manwaring. Her mother married Philemon Haven in 1807. Caulkins attended schools in Norwichtown and Norwich, Connecticut. She was a voracious reader and began early in life to collect information about history and genealogies. She lived with a maternal uncle in New London, where she began to publish essays in local newspapers about people and events of regional interest....

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Fahs, Sophia Lyon (02 August 1876–17 April 1978), religious educator, was born in Hangchow, China, the daughter of David Nelson Lyon and Mandana Doolittle, missionaries. The Lyon family returned to the United States on furlough in 1880, and poor health kept Mr. Lyons from returning to China. Sophia grew up in Wooster, Ohio, where she attended public schools and graduated from the Presbyterian University of Wooster in 1897. After two years of teaching high school, she spent two years traveling for the Student Volunteer Movement in the interest of foreign missions. She also took Old and New Testament courses at the University of Chicago, where higher criticism was revolutionizing scriptural studies with its concentration on establishing dates, authorship, and sources of the biblical writings in the spirit of scientific analysis. Dr. ...

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Miller, Lewis (24 July 1829–17 February 1899), educator, religious leader, and industrialist, was born in Greentown, Ohio, the third son of John Miller and Mary Elizabeth York Miller, farmers. Miller's mother died soon after his birth. In 1830 his father married Elizabeth Tawney Aultman, a widow with two children, who bore six more children and brought a fervent Methodism to the household. An enthusiastic reader, Lewis Miller relished his little time spent in the local school. The demands of farming frustrated his desire for extensive formal education. By age sixteen Miller occasionally taught school but perceived little opportunity for advancement in the profession without additional schooling. He learned the plaster trade, which offered shorter hours than farming, and devoted the extra time to personal studies....

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Reichel, William Cornelius (09 May 1824–25 October 1876), Moravian educator and historian, was born in Salem, North Carolina, the son of Gotthold Benjamin Reichel, a principal of Salem Female Academy, and Henriette Friederike Vierling, a housemother. Belonging to a family of high standing in the Moravian church ( ...

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Reu, Johann Michael (16 November 1869–14 October 1943), Lutheran church historian, author, and educational theorist, was born in Diebach, Bavaria, the son of Johann Friedrich Reu, a stone mason, and Margarete Henkelmann. As a child, his parish pastor tutored him in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. He attended the Latin School in Oettingen and from 1887 to 1889 the Seminary for Mission Workers at Neuendettelsau, from which he graduated. He emigrated to America in 1889 and was ordained by the German Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Iowa and Other States on 1 September 1889 as assistant pastor of St. John Lutheran Church in Mendota, Illinois. In October 1890 he accepted a call to serve Immanuel Lutheran Church in Rock Falls, Illinois, and from 1891 on was also pastor at St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church in Yorktown, Illinois. He married Marie Wilhelmine Schmitthenner in 1892; they had four children....

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Thomas Joseph Shahan. Right, with Archbishop Henry Edward Manning. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-105926).

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Shahan, Thomas Joseph (10 or 11 Sept. 1857–09 March 1932), Catholic clergyman, educator, and church historian, was born in Manchester, New Hampshire, the son of Maurice Peter Shahan and Mary Anne Carmody, Irish immigrants. He grew up in Millbury, Massachusetts, where his father owned a shoe store. After attending public schools there, he went in 1872 to the Sulpician Collège de Montréal (a minor seminary) for his classical and philosophical studies and there was introduced to neo-Thomism. In 1878 he became a seminarian at the North American College in Rome and a student of theology at the Urban College of the Propaganda Fide, where one of his professors was Francesco Satolli, a promoter of the Thomistic revival; he was also strongly influenced by the expert in Christian archaeology Giovanni Battista de Rossi. He was ordained priest on 3 June 1882 for the Diocese of Hartford (Connecticut) and was awarded the doctorate in theology....

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Whitsitt, William Heth (25 November 1841–20 January 1911), Baptist historian, educator, and seminary president, was born near Nashville, Tennessee, the son of Rubin Ewing Whitsitt and Dicey McFarland, farmers in the Cumberland Valley. In 1861 he graduated with distinction (M.A.) from Union University in Murfreesboro. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Whitsitt enlisted in the Confederate army as a private and served first as a scout, then as a chaplain. He was captured and spent a year in federal prisons....

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Wright, George Ernest (05 September 1909–29 August 1974), archaeologist and biblical theologian, was born in Zanesville, Ohio, the son of the Reverend Ernest Johnson Wright, a Presbyterian pastor, and Caroline L. Shedd. Wright and his family moved frequently during his childhood, following his father’s service as pastor of numerous small-town congregations throughout Pennsylvania and Ohio. He received his B.A. from the College of Wooster (Ohio) in 1931 and his B.D. from McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago, Illinois, in 1934, where he studied with Ovid R. Sellars. Wright was ordained a Presbyterian minister in April 1934 and had his first archaeological field experience as a member of Kyle Memorial Expedition to Bethel, Palestine, that summer. He entered Johns Hopkins University in the fall of 1934 to study under ...