1-20 of 22 results  for:

  • Quaker minister or preacher x
  • Religion and belief x
Clear all

Article

Ashbridge, Elizabeth (1713–16 May 1755), Quaker minister and autobiographer, was born Elizabeth Sampson in Middlewich, Cheshire, England, the daughter of Thomas Sampson, a ship’s surgeon, and Mary (maiden name unknown). What little is known about Ashbridge’s life is elicited almost entirely from her brief but compelling autobiography, ...

Article

Bean, Joel (16 December 1825–11 January 1914), Quaker minister and author, was born in Alton, New Hampshire, the son of John Bean and Elizabeth Ham, farmers. Joel received his education in local public schools and in the Friends Boarding School in Providence, Rhode Island, now Moses Brown School. Although the Beans were staunch Quakers, they lived at a distance from a Friends meeting, and so Joel had considerable contact with other denominations. After finishing at Providence, he taught in Quaker schools in New England and North Carolina....

Article

Bowers, Bathsheba (1672–1718), spiritual autobiographer and Quaker preacher, was born in Massachusetts, the daughter of Benanuel Bowers and Elizabeth Dunster, English Quakers who had resettled in Boston at the end of the seventeenth century to escape the Anglican faith of her father’s father. Because Bowers’s adolescent years were disrupted by the ruling Puritans’ persecution of Quakers, she and at least two of her eleven siblings were removed to Quaker Philadelphia, were Bowers spent most of her adult life....

Article

Coffin, Charles Fisher (03 April 1823–09 September 1916), banker, Quaker minister, and philanthropist, was born at New Garden, Guilford County, North Carolina, the son of Elijah Coffin, a teacher and banker, and Naomi Hiatt, a Quaker minister. In 1824 his family moved to Milton, Indiana, and in 1833 they went to Cincinnati for a year before moving to Richmond, Indiana, where Charles would live for the next half-century....

Article

Comstock, Elizabeth Leslie Rous Wright (30 October 1815–03 August 1891), Quaker minister and reformer, was born in Maidenhead, Berkshire, England, the daughter of William Rous, a shopkeeper, and Mary Kekwick. Her parents were Quakers with family ties to the Society of Friends going back to the seventeenth century. They reared her in a strict Quaker atmosphere, an upbringing reinforced by education in Quaker schools at Islington and Croyden. In 1839 Elizabeth Rous returned to Croyden as a teacher; in 1842 she joined the staff of the Friends school at Ackworth. She remained there until her marriage in 1848 to Leslie Wright, a Quaker market gardener of Walthamstow in Essex. They had one child. After her husband’s death in 1851, Elizabeth Wright kept a shop for a time at Bakewell in Devonshire. In 1854 she immigrated with her daughter and an unmarried sister to Belleville, Ontario. Four years later she married John T. Comstock, a prosperous Quaker farmer of Rollin, Michigan, where Elizabeth Comstock and her daughter moved....

Article

Fisher, Mary (1623–1698), pioneer Quaker preacher and missionary, was born in Pontefract, Yorkshire, England. Nothing is known of her parents and education. She was a servant girl in a home in Selby when she was converted to Quakerism by George Fox in 1651. She wrote an excellent if crabbed handwriting and expressed herself clearly....

Article

Gurney, Eliza Paul Kirkbride (06 April 1801–08 November 1881), Quaker minister, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Joseph Kirkbride and Mary Paul. Both parents came from Quaker families, and from childhood Kirkbride was acquainted with leading English and North American Friends. Three years in the Friends Boarding School at Westtown, Pennsylvania, reinforced such influences. Kirkbride’s mother died in 1807 and her father in 1816. Thereafter she made her home with relatives who were equally active and prominent Friends. In 1827 she became engaged to John Howell, a Quaker from Woodbury, New Jersey, but he died the following year....

Image

Elias Hicks. 1830 engraving of a drawing by Henry Inman. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-98115 ).

Article

Hicks, Elias (19 March 1748–27 February 1830), Quaker minister, was born in Hempstead, Long Island, New York, the son of John Hicks and Martha Smith, farmers. The Hicks family had Anglican roots, but Elias’s father became a member of the Society of Friends not long before Elias was born; his mother was uncomfortable with the mysticism of Quaker meeting and never joined. Elias received only a minimum of formal education, although he was apprenticed for a time to a carpenter, learned surveying, and taught occasionally in the village school. After marrying Jemima Seaman in Westbury meeting in 1770, he moved to her family’s farm in nearby Jericho. The couple had eleven children, but none of their four sons lived to adulthood, all dying of mysterious illnesses. In 1777 Hicks inherited the farm. Within a year he was formally recognized as a minister by his meeting, and in 1779 he went on the first of fifty-nine journeys of what Quakers called “traveling in the ministry.” Cultivating the habit of harkening to his inward leadings, a characteristic of Quakers of his age, marked him as a potential leader within the Society of Friends....

Article

Hoag, Joseph (22 April 1762–21 November 1846), Quaker minister, was born in Oblong, Dutchess County, New York, the son of Elijah Hoag and Phebe (maiden name unknown), farmers. As a child Hoag experienced many “divine visitations” and felt that he was called to preach. Despite uncertainties and some opposition, he began speaking in Quaker meetings when about eighteen years of age and was acknowledged as a minister a few years later. In 1782 Hoag married Huldah Case, who later became a well-known Quaker minister herself. Quakers regarded the ministry as a free gift from God and therefore disapproved of paid ministry. Hoag, like other Friends, rejected any suggestion that he receive payment or other support for his work in the ministry....

Article

Hume, Sophia Wigington (1702–26 January 1774), religious writer and Quaker minister, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the daughter of Henry Wigington, a colonial official, and Susanna Bayley. The family was wealthy, and Hume received a genteel education. Though her maternal grandmother was the Quaker minister ...

Article

Jay, Allen (11 October 1831–08 May 1910), Quaker minister and educator, was born in Miami County, Ohio, the son of Isaac Jay, a farmer and Quaker minister, and Rhoda Cooper. The Jays were a large and prominent Quaker family, and Allen Jay spent his early life in a Quaker community surrounded by relatives. He received his early education in Quaker schools in Miami and Montgomery counties, Ohio. In 1850 his family moved to Grant County, Indiana. Jay subsequently attended the Friends Boarding School (now Earlham College) at Richmond, Indiana, the Farmers Institute Academy near Lafayette, Indiana, and Antioch College (Yellow Springs, Ohio). On 20 September 1854 he was married at Farmers Institute to Martha Ann Sleeper; they had five children....

Article

Jones, Rebecca (08 July 1739–15 April 1818), Quaker minister, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of William Jones, a seaman, and Mary Porter, a school mistress. While Rebecca was still an infant her father died at sea, leaving her mother alone to raise her and her older brother Daniel. Mary Jones supported her family by keeping a school for young girls in her home where her daughter was educated. As a member of the Church of England, she raised her children in the Anglican tradition. Rebecca, however, showed interest in the Quaker religion. At age twelve, she asked to attend the Friends meetinghouse with the neighborhood children. Her mother assented, believing she was too young to make a serious decision about religion. Rebecca admired the “order and becoming deportment” of the Friends and attended as many meetings as possible, though she still admitted that she “loved vanity and folly” and kept “unprofitable company.”...

Article

Jones, Sybil (28 February 1808–04 December 1873), Quaker minister, was born in Brunswick, Maine, the daughter of Ephraim Jones and Susanna Dudley, farmers. In her early life she was influenced by the evangelicalism of the Methodists but did not leave the Friends. In 1824–1825 she attended the Friends school in Providence, Rhode Island. She taught public school for eight years in various locations in Maine and on 26 June 1833 married Eli Jones, another Quaker school teacher who had grown up on a farm in Maine. They settled on a farm in Dirigo, Maine, where they had five children....

Article

Malone, John Walter (11 August 1857–30 December 1935), Quaker minister and educator, was born near Marathon, Clermont County, Ohio, the son of John C. Malone and Mary Ann Pennington, farmers. When he was young, his family moved to the strongly Quaker community of New Vienna, Ohio. He attended public schools there and spent one term at Earlham College, a Quaker school in Richmond, Indiana, before entering the Chickering Institute, a preparatory school in Cincinnati. He graduated in 1877....

Article

Pemberton, John (27 November 1727–31 January 1795), Quaker minister, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Israel Pemberton, a wealthy merchant and preeminent Quaker, and Rachel Read, also a Quaker and active in the women’s meeting. Pemberton was trained by his father to be a merchant, but inherited wealth made it unnecessary for him to pursue a mercantile career and allowed him instead to follow religious pursuits. Considered sickly throughout his life, Pemberton was sent to England in 1750 both to improve his health and to establish the business ties any successful colonial merchant needed. Among the other passengers on the ship, however, was the Pennsylvania Quaker reformer John Churchman, who was paying a religious visit to Great Britain. Pemberton decided to accompany the older Churchman for “a few days” but ended up being his companion for the next four years. On that journey, the younger man spoke his first words in public, thus beginning his work as a minister. Before returning home, he traveled throughout England, Ireland, and Holland. He returned to Philadelphia in 1754, shortly after the death of his father. He lived with his widowed mother until her death in 1765....

Article

Russell, Elbert (25 August 1871–21 September 1951), educator, Quaker minister, and religious writer, was born near Friendsville, Tennessee, the son of William Russell, a teacher and Quaker minister, and Eliza Sanders. William Russell was an idealist who had moved from Indiana to East Tennessee to help rebuild the small Quaker communities there after the Civil War. He and his wife both died in 1879, and Elbert Russell spent the rest of his childhood with his grandparents in West Newton, Indiana. In 1890 he entered Earlham College, the Quaker school in Richmond, Indiana, graduating with honors in 1894 and remaining as governor of the men’s dormitory. In 1895 he married an Earlham classmate, Liuetta Cox....

Article

Sands, David (04 October 1745–04 June 1818), Quaker preacher, was born in Cow Neck, Long Island, New York, the son of Nathaniel Sands and Mercy (maiden name unknown), farmers. Sands’s Presbyterian parents moved about 1759 to a farm near Cornwall, Orange County, New York. Self-taught, he left home in 1765 to teach school and later kept a store in Cornwall. In deep religious anxiety he found reassurance in the home of Quakers Edward and Phebe Hallock, who introduced him to Nine Partners Meeting across the Hudson River, of which he became a member. He married their daughter Clementina in November 1771 and lived thereafter in a house next to his parents. At the homes of his wife’s kin and later on visits everywhere he refused to be served by slaves. Speaking in meeting and in a worship group in his home, he was “recorded as a Minister” and began a career as one of the itinerant “public Friends” by whom the growing network of meetings was sustained. In 1775 with a fellow member of his meeting he visited nineteen meetings and home worship groups in Rhode Island and on Cape Cod, staying in the home of merchant ...

Article

Starbuck, Mary Coffyn (20 February 1646–13 November 1717), Quaker minister, was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, the daughter of Tristram Coffyn and Dionis Stevens, who had emigrated from Brixton in Devonshire in 1642. Generations of genealogical errors have made it virtually impossible to determine the Coffyns’ social status in England, and Tristram Coffyn’s religious views are uncertain. In Massachusetts he moved around a lot, living in Newbury and Salisbury as well as Haverhill, keeping an ordinary and running a ferry before, in 1659, heading the group that purchased Nantucket Island, where the family moved in 1660 or 1661. Tristram Coffyn served as a magistrate and was the island’s most influential citizen until his death in 1681....

Article

Updegraff, David Brainerd (23 August 1830–23 May 1894), Quaker holiness preacher, was born at Mount Pleasant, Ohio, the son of David Updegraff, a farmer and merchant, and Rebecca Taylor, a Quaker minister. Mount Pleasant was the center of a large Quaker settlement in eastern Ohio, and the Updegraffs and Taylors were among its most prominent leaders. Rebecca Taylor Updegraff and her mother Ann Schofield Taylor were both prominent Quaker ministers who traveled widely in North America, while Rebecca’s father, Jonathan Taylor, was the clerk, or presiding officer, of Ohio Yearly Meeting of Friends....