1-15 of 15 results  for:

  • pacifist or peace campaigner x
  • Education and scholarship x
Clear all

Article

Andrews, Fannie Fern Phillips (25 September 1867–23 January 1950), pacifist and educational reformer, was born in Margaretville, Nova Scotia, the daughter of William Wallace Phillips, a shoemaker, and Anna Maria Brown, a church activist. Andrews grew up in Lynn, Massachusetts; she graduated from Salem Normal School in 1884 and taught school in Lynn between 1884 and 1890. In 1890 she married Edwin G. Andrews, a salesman in Lynn; they had no children. In 1895–1896 Andrews resumed her studies, at the Harvard summer school, and in 1902 she received her A.B. from Radcliffe in education and psychology....

Image

Emily Green Balch Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-114732).

Article

Balch, Emily Greene (08 January 1867–09 January 1961), peace activist, sociologist, and Nobel Peace Prize winner, was born in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, the daughter of Francis Vergnies Balch, a lawyer, and Ellen Maria Noyes. She was in the first graduating class at Bryn Mawr College, earning her degree in 1889. After studying privately for a year with sociologist ...

Article

DeBenedetti, Charles Louis (27 January 1943–27 January 1987), historian, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Louis Albert DeBenedetti, a bread delivery truck driver, and Clementine Caroline Diero DeBenedetti, a legal secretary. “Chuck,” as DeBenedetti liked to be called, attended Mendal Catholic High School and graduated in 1960. Reared in a strong Italian-Catholic family, DeBenedetti applied to and was accepted at the Jesuit-run Loyola University in Chicago, from which he graduated in 1964. On 29 August 1964 he married Sandra Kisala from Chicago. They had two children. DeBenedetti then enrolled in the graduate history program at the University of Illinois. In 1968 he was awarded his Ph.D. His dissertation, “American Internationalism in the 1920's: Shotwell and the Outlawrists,” supervised by ...

Article

Dennett, Mary Coffin Ware (04 April 1872–25 July 1947), birth control and sex education reformer and pacifist, was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, the daughter of George Whitefield, a wool merchant, and Livonia Coffin Ware. When Dennett was ten her father died and the family moved to Boston, where she attended public schools and went on to Miss Capen’s School for Girls in Northampton, Massachusetts. Dennett then studied at the school of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, where she displayed a great talent for tapestry and leather design. From 1894 to 1897 she headed the Department of Design and Decoration at the Drexel Institute in Philadelphia. After a trip to Europe with her sister, during which they collected gilded Cordovan leather wall hangings, the sisters opened a handicraft shop in Boston. Dennett helped organize the Boston Society of Arts and Crafts in 1897. She served on the council of the society until 1905, when her interest in politics and social welfare began to supersede her interest in the arts. In 1900 she married William Hartley Dennett, a Boston architect with whom she had two sons. The marriage ended in divorce in 1913 with Dennett receiving custody of their children....

Article

Fincke, William M. (01 January 1878–31 May 1927), pacifist minister and educator, was born William Mann Fincke in New York City, the son of William H. Fincke, a wealthy businessman, and Julia Murrid Clark Fincke. In 1897 he graduated from the Hill School and in the fall entered Yale University, “where he played halfback on the varsity eleven” ( ...

Article

Firth, Roderick (30 January 1917–22 December 1987), philosopher and educator, was born in Orange, New Jersey, the son of Leo Earl Firth, who was in the advertising business, and Ida Lake. Firth attended primary and secondary schools in New Jersey and spent summers boarding at Mountain Farm in Cobbleskill, New York. In 1934 he graduated from Newark Academy and in the same year entered Haverford College....

Image

Allen Ginsberg, late 1960s. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-119239).

Article

Ginsberg, Allen (03 June 1926–06 April 1997), poet, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the younger son of Louis Ginsberg, a high school English teacher and and Naomi Levy Ginsberg. Ginsberg grew up with his older brother Eugene in a household shadowed by his mother's mental illness; she suffered from recurrent epileptic seizures and paranoia. An active member of the Communist Party–USA, Naomi Ginsberg took her sons to meetings of the radical left dedicated to the cause of international Communism during the Great Depression of the 1930s....

Image

Thomas Smith Grimké. Portrait of Thomas Smith Grimké (1786-1834). Oil on canvas. Portrait by Abraham G.D. Tuthill. Courtesy of Miami University Art Museum, Oxford, Ohio.

Article

Grimké, Thomas Smith (26 September 1786–12 October 1834), lawyer, educational and peace reformer, politician, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the second son of John Faucheraud Grimké and Mary Smith Grimké. John Grimké, a native Charlestonian of French Huguenot stock, was educated at the University of Cambridge, an officer in the American Revolution, and head justice of the state’s Court of Appeals. Mary Grimké, a descendant of an English landgrave, the state’s founding aristocracy, and the famous Irish rebel leader Rory O’Moore, was a co-founder of Charleston’s female benevolent society. Other children included ...

Article

Hughan, Jessie Wallace (25 December 1875–10 April 1955), pacifist, socialist, and teacher, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Samuel Hughan, an accountant and librarian, and Margaret West. Both parents were religious seekers and followers of Henry George’s Single Tax theory. Hughan attended Barnard College, graduating in 1898 with an A.B. in economics. A year later she received an A.M. from Columbia University with a thesis on Henry George’s economic theories. In 1910 she was awarded a Ph.D. from Columbia; the title of her dissertation was “The Present Status of Socialism in America.” Having become acquainted with Socialist party members through her research, she herself became a socialist in 1907. The Socialist party recognized her leadership potential and appointed her to its executive committee and that of the Inter-Collegiate Socialist Society, later the League for Industrial Democracy. She also ran as a socialist candidate for a number of offices, including the U.S. Senate in 1924....

Article

Trueblood, Benjamin Franklin (25 November 1847–26 October 1916), college president and peace activist, was born in Salem, Indiana, the son of Joshua Trueblood and Esther Parker Trueblood, farmers. They were Quakers. After graduating in 1868 from a Quaker school, Earlham College, where he majored in Greek and Roman literature, Trueblood served as a professor of classics at Penn College in Oskaloosa, Iowa. His commitment to moral principles was a benchmark of his character and stood him in good stead throughout his professional career. On 12 July 1872 he married Sarah Hough Terrell of New Vienna, Ohio; they were to have three children. From 1872 to 1879 he was president of Wilmington College, another Quaker school, in Wilmington, Ohio. From 1879 to 1890 he continued his administrative career as president of Penn College....

Image

Mary Emma Woolley Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-111858).

Article

Woolley, Mary Emma (13 July 1863–05 September 1947), educator, feminist, and peace activist, was born in South Norwalk, Connecticut, the daughter of Joseph Judah Woolley, a Congregational minister, and his second wife, Mary Augusta Ferris. May, as she was called, spent a happy, nurturing childhood in New England, first in Meriden, Connecticut, and then, beginning in 1871, at her father’s new pastorate in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Reverend Woolley’s attempts to combine religious and social work—whether in reaching out to factory workers or in challenging St. Paul’s injunction of silence for women—profoundly influenced his daughter....