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Cobb, Thomas Reade Rootes (10 April 1823–13 December 1862), lawyer and Confederate congressman and military officer, was born in Jefferson County, Georgia, the son of John Addison Cobb, a planter, and Sarah Robinson Rootes. His older brother, Howell Cobb—congressman, governor, and secretary of the treasury under ...

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Gartrell, Lucius Jeremiah (07 January 1821–07 April 1891), soldier and U.S. and Confederate congressman, was born in Wilkes County, Georgia, the son of Joseph Gartrell, Jr., a planter and merchant, and Eliza Boswell. After attending the state university and Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, Gartrell read law in the Washington, Georgia, office of another future Confederate commander, ...

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Huse, Caleb (11 February 1831–11 March 1905), soldier and Confederate arms procurement agent in Europe, was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, the son of Ralph Cross Huse and Caroline Evans, occupations unknown. In 1851 he graduated from the U.S. Military Academy, seventh in his class. A year later he married Harriet Pinckney, a union that produced thirteen children. From 1852 until 1859 Huse was assigned to West Point as an assistant professor of chemistry, mineralogy, and geology, serving under Superintendent ...

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Toombs, Robert Augustus (02 July 1810–15 December 1885), U.S. senator, Confederate cabinet member, and Confederate general, was born near Washington in Wilkes County, Georgia, the son of Robert Toombs, a successful planter who had served in the American Revolution, and Catharine Huling. In 1824 “Bob” Toombs entered Franklin College in Athens (now the University of Georgia) but in January 1828 was dismissed by the faculty for unspecified reasons after various incidents. He enrolled at Union College, Schenectady, New York, graduating that summer, and spent a year at the University of Virginia Law School, where he tied for bottom place in his class of fourteen. Despite his lack of academic distinction, his social connections enabled Toombs to establish himself quickly. In 1829 the Georgia legislature passed a bill allowing him to practice law while still a minor. In 1830 he married Julia Ann DuBose, the daughter of a wealthy planter and sister of his half-brother Lawrence’s wife. They had three children, two of whom survived infancy. The couple were lavish hosts in the nation’s capital and at home, and Toombs enjoyed all the luxuries of one of the elite of the Old South....