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Fagen, David (1875–01 December 1901?), captain in the Filipino nationalist army, was born in Tampa, Florida. Little is known about either his parents or his early life. In the summer of 1899, just after the United States ended the war with Spain, Fagen was a corporal in the Twenty-fourth Infantry of Company I. He was among the black soldiers of the Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth infantries and the Ninth and Tenth cavalries dispatched to the Philippines in the U.S. effort to enforce territorial concessions granted by Spain in a peace treaty signed in February 1899. Emilio Aguinaldo, an ardent Filipino nationalist, led a guerrilla war resisting what he considered the United States replacing Spain as colonizer....

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Levy, Bert “Yank” (05 October 1897–02 September 1965), soldier and writer, was born Isaac Meyer Levy, according to a 1945 transcript of his Ontario birth certificate (Wikipedia offers incorrectly that his name at birth was Albert), in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, one of ten children of Samuel Levy, a tailor and sometime horse doctor, and Sarah Pollock. Shortly after Levy's birth the family relocated to Buffalo, New York, finally putting down roots in Cleveland, Ohio, when Levy was about seven. Levy, initially a frail child, left school at sixteen when his father was critically injured in a trolley accident. Employed in a variety of jobs to help support his younger siblings, Levy developed himself mentally and physically through the Boy Scouts and boxing. Years later he had numerous bouts in Ohio and Pennsylvania, though it is unclear whether they were amateur or professional. As a teenager, Levy worked for four years for the Kaber Printing Company in Cleveland....

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Quantrill, William Clarke (31 July 1837–06 June 1865), pro-Confederate guerrilla leader, was born in Canal Dover (now Dover), Ohio, the son of Thomas H. Quantrill, a tinsmith and teacher, and Caroline Clarke. After acquiring a better-than-average education for the time and place, and following his father’s death in 1854, Quantrill taught school in Canal Dover and various other towns in the Midwest before moving to Kansas in 1857. During the next three years he engaged in various occupations—farming, teamstering with an army expedition to Utah, gold prospecting in Colorado—before again teaching school, this time in Stanton, Kansas. In 1860 he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, where under the alias of Charley Hart he became a jayhawker (best defined as a bandit with professed abolitionist sympathies). In December 1860, facing arrest in Lawrence for his criminal activities, he betrayed a group of jayhawkers into an ambush at the farm of Morgan Walker in Jackson County, Missouri, thereby gaining the confidence of the people of that locality, to whom he represented himself as being a native of Maryland and proslavery. After the outbreak of the Civil War he served with Confederate forces in Missouri. Late in 1861 he returned to Jackson County, where he soon became the leader of a guerrilla band, which he led in a series of raids into Kansas and against pro-Union Missourians. Having helped regular Confederate forces capture Independence, Missouri (11 Aug. 1862), he received a captain’s commission as a partisan ranger. By this time he was the most notorious of the many “bushwhackers” operating in western Missouri....

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Rogers, Robert (07 November 1731–18 May 1795), soldier, was born in Methuen, Massachusetts, the son of James Rogers and Mary (maiden name unknown), farmers. Soon after his birth, his father, an Irish settler, moved the family to Dunbarton, New Hampshire, then the frontier, where he was raised. Rogers grew to be a skilled trader and frontiersman and became a colonial scout in the third French and Indian War, “King George’s War.” In 1755 he worked as a recruiter for Massachusetts colonial governor ...

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Patrick G. Williams

Sisson, Jack (1743?–1821), soldier, was also known as Tack Sisson, Guy Watson, or Prince. He was one of those African-American patriots whose lives were allowed by their contemporaries to become shrouded in obscurity. Little record exists of his whereabouts, activities, or circumstances before or after the exploit for which he is noted—the July 1777 abduction of Brigadier General Richard Prescott, commander of the redcoat garrison at Newport, Rhode Island. Sisson was among the forty volunteers Lieutenant Colonel ...