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Bethany K. Dumas and Lisabeth G. Svendsgaard

Bigelow, Melvin Madison (02 August 1846–04 May 1921), law professor and author, was born near Eaton Rapids, Michigan, the son of William Enos Bigelow, a Methodist clergyman, and Daphne Florence Madison or Mattison, as it was sometimes spelled. The family was descended from John Bigelow, who came from England and settled at Watertown, Massachusetts, before 1642. Bigelow attended public schools wherever his father was stationed in the territory of the Detroit Conference, most of which was sparsely populated frontier country. He went on to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, earning an A.B. in 1866, an LL.B. in 1868, and an A.M. in 1871. In 1879 he received additional degrees, an A.M. and a Ph.D., from Harvard University. He studied law in Pontiac, Michigan, for a short time, then joined an uncle, Joseph Enos Bigelow, who practiced law in Memphis, Tennessee. He was admitted to the Tennessee bar in 1868. A boyhood friend, Marshall Davis Ewell, later a well-known law teacher and writer himself, followed him to Memphis, and the two helped prepare the manuscript of H. Clay King’s ...

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Curtis, George Ticknor (28 November 1812–28 March 1894), lawyer and historian, was born in Watertown, Massachusetts, the son of Benjamin Curtis, a master in the merchant marine, and Lois Robbins. After his father died abroad, his mother raised him and his brother Benjamin Robbins Curtis...

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Howe, Mark De Wolfe (22 May 1906–28 February 1967), legal historian and civil rights activist, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Mark Antony DeWolfe Howe, a noted biographer, and Fanny Huntington Quincy. Howe lived in the Boston-Cambridge area all of his life. He attended prestigious Phillips Andover Academy and received his B.A. from Harvard in 1928, then his LL.B. from Harvard Law School in 1933. In 1935 he married Mary Manning, with whom he had three children....

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Warren, Charles (09 March 1868–16 August 1954), lawyer and legal historian, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Winslow Warren, lawyer and collector of the Port of Boston, and Mary Lincoln Tinkham. Three years after Charles’s birth, the family moved to Dedham, where the Warrens remained active and loyal Democrats in a bastion of Republicanism. In 1885 Warren followed generations of Warrens by entering Harvard College. He was graduated with an A.B. in 1889 and in 1892, after two years of study, was awarded an A.M. from Harvard Law School. Throughout his life, as class secretary, the chronicler of law school history, overseer, and alumni association president, Warren was a loyal son of Harvard. Indeed, Warren was often identified with his ever-present crimson necktie....