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Baker, Hugh Potter (20 January 1878–24 May 1950), forester and university administrator, was born in St. Croix Falls, Polk County, Wisconsin, the son of Joseph Stannard Baker, a land agent, and Alice Potter. His father was financially successful, and Baker grew up in surroundings that were physically comfortable and culture-filled. Both of his parents having attended college, Baker received his early schooling locally before entering Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, where he remained a year before transferring to Michigan Agricultural College (now Michigan State University). He graduated with a B.S. in 1901, having also begun work in partnership with his brother, Fred Baker, in a part-time position at the federal Division of Forestry. This division, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, was then run by pioneer forester and future governor of Pennsylvania ...

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Dabney, Charles William (19 June 1855–15 June 1945), educator, college president, and agrichemist, was born in Hampden-Sydney, Virginia, the son of Robert Louis Dabney, a Presbyterian theologian, and Margaretta Lavinia Morrison. His mother and father were both from prominent southern families, and his father served as chaplain to ...

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Knapp, Seaman Asahel (10 December 1833–01 April 1911), college president and advocate for the improvement of southern agriculture, was born in Schroon Lake, Essex County, New York, the son of Bradford Knapp, a physician, and Rhonda Seaman. Following preparatory work at Troy Conference Academy, Poultney, Vermont, he enrolled at Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1852 and graduated with honors in 1856. Three weeks later he married Maria Elizabeth Hotchkiss of Hampton, New York; the couple had five children. Knapp taught initially at Fort Edward Institute, Fort Edward, New York, where he soon became a junior partner in the administration of the institute. Then in 1863 he purchased half-interest in his alma mater, the Troy Conference Academy, known subsequently as Ripley Female College. In 1864 Knapp joined with eight other men to incorporate a business school specifically for young men, named Poultney Normal Institute....

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Pugh, Evan (29 February 1828–29 April 1864), educator and scientist, was born in East Nottingham Township in Chester County, Pennsylvania, the son of Lewis Pugh and Mary Hutton, farmers. Both parents, who were Quakers, traced their American ancestry to the Pughs who numbered among the early Welsh Friends emigrating to Pennsylvania. Apprenticed to a blacksmith at age sixteen, Pugh enrolled three years later in a manual labor academy at Whitestown, New York. Farm work along with studying scientific literature sparked his interest in applying science to agriculture....