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Corbin, Austin (11 July 1827–04 June 1896), financier, real estate developer, and railroad executive, was born in Newport, New Hampshire, the son of Austin Corbin, a farmer and politician, and Mary Chase. Corbin had little formal education. He attended the common schools in Newport and taught there briefly as a young man. He read law under two New England attorneys and then enrolled in Harvard Law School, graduating in 1849. Corbin was not an active member of the bar for very long. For two years he practiced law in Newport with Ralph Metcalf. In 1851 he moved to Davenport, Iowa, and continued as an attorney for three more years. In 1853 he married Hannah Maria Wheeler of Newport; they had four children....

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Dillingham, Benjamin Franklin (04 September 1844–20 August 1918), businessman, was born in West Brewster, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, the son of Benjamin Clark Dillingham, a shipmaster, and Lydia Sears Howes. Dillingham was educated in the public schools of Southboro and Worcester, Massachusetts. He left school at age fourteen to become a seaman on the merchant ship ...

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Huntington, Henry Edwards (27 February 1850–23 May 1927), urban developer, railroad executive, and book and art collector, was born in Oneonta, New York, the son of Solon Huntington, a merchant, land speculator, and farmer, and Harriet Saunders. His father was conservative by nature, and it was his uncle, railway magnate ...

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See Van Sweringen, Oris Paxton

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Van Sweringen, Oris Paxton (24 April 1879–23 November 1936), and Mantis James Van Sweringen (08 July 1881–12 December 1935), real estate developers and railroad financiers, were born near Wooster, Ohio, the sons of James Tower Sweringen and Jennie Curtis. (In their adult lives the brothers began using an older version of the family name.) Their father was rootless and earned little income; their mother died in 1886. The family settled in Cleveland, Ohio, circa 1890, where their siblings raised and supported the brothers—neither of whom went past the eighth grade in school but both of whom studied business on their own....