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Claiborne, William Charles Coles (1775–23 November 1817), frontier politician, was born in Sussex County, Virginia, the son of William Claiborne, a small landowner, and Mary Leigh. He attended Richmond Academy and studied briefly at the College of William and Mary until financial difficulties ended his formal instruction at age fifteen. ...

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Denver, James William (23 October 1817–09 August 1892), soldier, governor of Kansas Territory, and lawyer, was born near Winchester, Virginia, the son of Patrick Denver and Jane Campbell, farmers of Irish extraction. In 1831 his family migrated to a farm near Wilmington, Ohio. After a grade school education, James taught briefly at Platte City, Missouri, graduated from Cincinnati College (now the University of Cincinnati) in 1844, and was admitted to the bar. He opened a newspaper and law office in Xenia, Ohio, but after less than a year, in 1845, returned to Platte City, where he continued to practice both professions. After the outbreak of the Mexican War on 4 March 1847, Denver was appointed captain in the Twelfth Regiment, U.S. Volunteers, commanding a company he had raised, and was ordered to Mexico. Sick much of the time, he was ordered home on 26 October 1847....

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Goodwin, John Noble (18 October 1824–29 April 1887), lawyer, congressman, and territorial governor of Arizona, was born in South Berwick, Maine, the son of John Goodwin, a lawyer, and Mary Noble. He was educated at Berwick Academy and Dartmouth College. After graduating from Dartmouth in 1844, he returned to his home town, read law in the office of John Hubbard, and was admitted to the bar in 1848. In 1854 he was elected to the state senate from York County and the following year was appointed to a special commission to revise the laws of Maine. In 1857 he married Susan Howard; they had one child who survived to adulthood. Goodwin supported the establishment of the Republican party and in 1860 was elected to Congress from the First District with a majority of 1,462 votes. He did not deliver a major speech during his term in Congress, but he was a member of the House Committee on Invalid Pensions. Although the rest of the state remained strongly Republican in the fall elections of 1862, Goodwin lost in his district to his Democratic opponent, Lorenzo Sweat, by the narrow margin of 247 votes....

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Andrew Jackson. From an engraving by James Barton Longacre. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-117120).

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Jackson, Andrew (15 March 1767–08 June 1845), soldier and seventh president of the United States, was born in the Waxhaw Settlement, South Carolina, the son of Andrew Jackson and Elizabeth Hutchinson, farmers. Like many other Scotch-Irish at the time, Andrew and Elizabeth Jackson migrated to this country from the port of Carrickfergus in Northern Ireland in 1765, landing most probably in Philadelphia and then journeying southward to join relatives living in the Waxhaw Settlement along the northwestern boundary separating North and South Carolina. They settled with their two sons, Hugh and Robert, on a stretch of land on the south side of Twelve Mile Creek, a branch of the Catawba River, and for two years tried to scratch a living from this acid soil. Then, early in March 1767, Andrew died suddenly. Approximately two weeks later, on 15 March, Elizabeth gave birth to her third son and named him after her deceased husband. Later a dispute arose over the exact location of the birthplace of the future president—whether he was born in North or South Carolina—but Jackson himself always believed and repeatedly stated that he was born in South Carolina....

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Magoon, Charles Edward (05 December 1861–14 January 1920), lawyer and public servant, was born in Steele County, Minnesota, the son of Henry C. Magoon and Mehitable W. Clement. Magoon moved with his family to Platte County, Nebraska, shortly after the end of the Civil War. He studied in various programs at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln for three years in the late 1870s, leaving without a degree to study law in the firm of Mason and Whedon, which became Whedon and Magoon shortly after his admission to the bar in 1882. A respected member of the local legal community, Magoon often commented on legal issues for the ...

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McCook, Edward Moody (15 June 1833–09 September 1909), politician, lawyer, and soldier, was born in Steubenville, Ohio, the son of John McCook, a physician, and Catharine Julia Sheldon. After being educated in the Steubenville public schools, McCook moved to Minnesota in 1849. When news of the highly publicized gold strikes in Colorado began to sweep the country, McCook was one of the fifty-niners involved in the rush to the new gold fields. He settled in the mining camp of Central City, where he amassed a respectable fortune. Moreover, he began to practice law and was elected to the Kansas legislature in 1859, when Colorado was still part of Kansas Territory. McCook was also a leader in the movement that led to the creation of Colorado as a separate territory on 28 February 1861, a month after Kansas became a state....

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Reeder, Andrew Horatio (12 July 1807–05 July 1864), lawyer and first governor of Kansas Territory, was born in Easton, Pennsylvania, the son of Absolom Reeder, a merchant, and Christiana Smith. Reeder received his education at an academy in Lawrenceville, New Jersey; later he read law and was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar in 1828. He married Amelia Hutter in 1831 and fathered eight children, five of whom lived to adulthood....