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Daniel, Peter Vivian (24 April 1784–31 May 1860), lawyer, state official, and associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was born at “Crow’s Nest,” in Stafford County, Virginia, the son of Travers Daniel, a planter, and Frances Moncure. His ancestors settled in Virginia early in the seventeenth century and founded a prominent gentry family. Daniel attended the College of New Jersey at Princeton for a time, but left in 1805 to read law in Richmond with ...

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John Alexander Kennedy. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-109831).

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Kennedy, John Alexander (09 August 1803–20 June 1873), immigration official and police superintendent, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of John Kennedy, a schoolmaster who, accompanied by his wife (name unknown), immigrated to the United States from the north of Ireland. After receiving a common school education, Kennedy learned the sign painter’s trade. Residence in the slave state of Maryland bred in him a hostility to slavery that was to prove lifelong. In 1925 he became secretary of the newly formed Maryland Anti-Slavery Society, but the society was soon forced to disband by mob action. At about the same time he became ...

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Reed, John (05 June 1786–19 January 1850), legal educator, judge, and author, was born in Millerstown, Pennsylvania, the son of General William Reed, a farmer who distinguished himself during the Revolutionary War and in 1790 was a member of the convention from York County that in the same year framed the first constitution of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. William Reed later served as a senator in the state legislature, representing York and Adams counties in 1806. The name of John Reed's mother is unknown. John Reed remained on the farm until the age of seventeen, when he was sent together with his brother William to grammar school under the care of the Reverend Mr. James Dobbin at Gettysburg. Both Reed brothers attended Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, graduating—according to college records—with the class of 1806. Then the two studied law under the supervision of William Maxwell of Gettysburg. In 1809 John Reed was admitted to the bar, and as his autobiography relates, he “settled down for practice in Greensburg, Westmoreland County” on 1 April of that year. For several years he practiced in the counties of Somerset, Indiana, Armstrong, and Westmoreland, acting as prosecuting attorney in the latter two counties....

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Weinfeld, Edward (14 May 1901–17 January 1988), New York housing commissioner and U.S. district judge, was born in New York City, the son of Abraham Weinfeld and Fanny Singer. Weinfeld’s parents were proprietors of a bar on the Lower East Side, where Weinfeld and his brother Morris worked from time to time. In 1921 Weinfeld received a law degree from New York University, which he attended at night while working full time during the day. He set up a law practice in Manhattan and became active in local Democratic party politics. Weinfeld married Lillian Stoll in 1929; they had two daughters....