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Anderson, Joseph Inslee (05 November 1757–17 April 1837), jurist, U.S. senator, and Treasury official, was born near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of William Anderson and Elizabeth Inslee (occupations unknown). When not yet twenty, Anderson enlisted in the Continental army as a private and rose to the rank of major by the war’s end. He was regimental paymaster during much of the war, and his experience in that capacity served him well in positions he held later. He was with ...

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Arnold, Thurman (02 June 1891–07 November 1969), lawyer, social and economic theorist, and government official, was born Thurman Wesley Arnold in Laramie, Wyoming, the son of Constantine Peter Arnold, a prominent attorney and rancher, and Annie Brockway. After spending his youth in what he would later remember “as a time that Tom Sawyer would have envied,” Arnold enrolled, for one year, at Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana, in 1907. After a college career characterized by loneliness, he graduated from Princeton University, Phi Beta Kappa, with a B.A. in 1911. Arnold received his LL.D. from Harvard Law School in 1914 and then entered legal practice in Chicago with the firm of Adams, Follansbee, Hawley, and Shorey. In 1916 he established the firm of O’Bryan, Waite, and Arnold. Eight months later his artillery battery of the Illinois National Guard was mobilized for duty with General ...

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Ballantine, Arthur Atwood (03 August 1883–10 October 1960), corporate lawyer and Treasury official, was born in Oberlin, Ohio, the son of William Gay Ballantine, a professor and president of Oberlin College, and Emma Atwood. He graduated with honors from Harvard College (1904) and Harvard Law School (1907). On 19 June 1907 he married Helen Bailey Graves; they had five children....

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Bennett, James Van Benschoten (28 August 1894–19 November 1978), director of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, was born in Silver Creek, New York, the son of Edmund C. Bennett, an Episcopalian clergyman, and Mary Frances Berry, a former teacher. Bennett attended Brown University, where he received an A.B. in 1918, and served in the Army Air Corps during the closing months of World War I. In 1919 he married Marie Ettl; they had three children....

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Brown, Walter Folger (31 May 1869–26 January 1961), lawyer, politician, and government official, was born in Massillon, Ohio, the son of James Marshall Brown, a lawyer, and Lavinia Folger. Reared in comfortable circumstances, Brown graduated from Western Reserve Academy in 1888 and Harvard University in 1892, worked briefly for the ...

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Bundy, Harvey Hollister (30 March 1888–07 October 1963), lawyer, assistant secretary of state, and special assistant to the secretary of war, was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the son of McGeorge Bundy, a lawyer, and Mary Goodhue Hollister. Bundy attended private school in his hometown and Hackley School in Tarrytown, New York. He graduated from Yale University in 1909 with a degree in psychology. Unsure about a career in law, he accepted a one-year teaching position at St. Mark’s Boys Preparatory School in Southboro, Massachusetts. The following year he served as a traveling companion for a “wayward” boy on a trip around much of the world, which seems to have shaped Bundy’s love for international affairs. Upon his return he entered Harvard University Law School, and following graduation in 1914, he worked as a stenographic clerk, legal aide, and traveling companion for U.S. Supreme Court justice ...

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Cary, William Lucius (27 November 1910–07 February 1983), chairman of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and law professor, was born in Columbus, Ohio, the son of William Lincoln Cary, a utilities lawyer and executive, and Ellen Taugher. At the age of sixteen Cary enrolled at Yale College, where he received his A.B. in 1931. In 1934 he received his J.D. from Yale Law School, where he took one of the last corporate finance courses taught by ...

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Casey, William Joseph (13 March 1913–06 May 1987), lawyer and government official, was born in New York City, the son of William Joseph Casey, Sr., a city official and Democratic party functionary, and Blanche La Vigne, a department store stock buyer. The eldest of three surviving children, William Casey, familiarly known as “Bill,” eschewed the suffix “junior.”...

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Cotton, Joseph Potter (22 July 1875–10 March 1931), corporate lawyer and public official, was born in Newport, Rhode Island, the son of Joseph Cotton and Isabella Cole. Following a public education in Newport, Cotton attended Harvard College, graduating in 1896. He taught English at Harvard in 1896–1897, earned an A.M. in 1897, and then entered Harvard Law School in the fall of 1897. A distinguished student, he became editor in chief of the ...

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Dean, Gordon Evans (28 December 1905–15 August 1958), lawyer and public servant, was born in Seattle, Washington, the son of John Marvin Dean, a Baptist clergyman, and Beatrice Alice Fisken. A strong element of serendipity marked Dean’s early career. As a student at the University of Redlands, he planned to be a teacher of English, but he changed his major to political science following his first traumatic encounter with students as an apprentice at a local junior high school. After graduating in 1927, he obtained a law degree at the University of Southern California (USC), where he came under the protective wing of the law school dean, Justin Miller. In 1930 Dean married Adelaide Williamson. They had two children before divorcing in 1953. Through the intercession of Miller, who in 1930 was appointed dean at Duke University, Dean that same year became assistant dean and instructor at Duke and acquired a master’s degree in law from the university in 1932....