1-6 of 6 results  for:

  • Christian: other x
  • Results with images only x
Clear all

Article

Cotton, John (04 December 1584–23 December 1652), clergyman, was born in Derby, Derbyshire, England, the son of Roland Cotton, a lawyer, and Mary Hurlbert. A serious and talented student, he matriculated at Trinity College, Cambridge, at the age of thirteen. He received his B.A. in 1603 and his M.A. in 1606, the year he became a fellow at Emmanuel College. He remained there until 1612, serving as lecturer, catechist, dean, and tutor while acquiring a reputation as both an able disputant and a remarkable preacher. At first his preaching was in the learned and ornate style, but after being spiritually affected in 1609 by the preaching of Richard Sibbes, he adopted the plain Puritan style. Although this change was received with dismay by many of his admirers in Cambridge, it was responsible for the conversion of John Preston, later master of Emmanuel and an eminent Puritan divine. Cotton was ordained in 1610, and in 1613 he received the B.D. His first call was as vicar of St. Botolph’s Church in Boston, Lincolnshire, where he served from 1612 until shortly before his departure for New England in 1633. In 1613 Cotton married Elizabeth Horrocks, sister of a Lancashire minister. During his Lincolnshire ministry, Cotton ran an informal seminary for recent Cambridge graduates. Young Dutch and German exiles from the war on the Continent also lived with the Cottons, so that, as his contemporary ...

Article

Mather, Cotton (12 February 1663–13 February 1728), Puritan minister, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Increase Mather, a Puritan minister, and Maria Cotton. The marriage of Increase Mather and Maria Cotton continued the union of two great New England families. Richard Mather...

Article

Mather, Increase (21 June 1639–23 August 1723), Puritan minister, was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, the son of Richard Mather, Dorchester’s minister, and Katherine Holt, both of Lancashire, England. Increase was the youngest of five sons, four of whom also became ministers. His father was among the most prominent religious leaders of early Massachusetts, and Increase was raised in a family of considerable social eminence. From the age of twelve he lived in Boston in the home of ...

Article

Occom, Samson (1723–14 July 1792), Presbyterian preacher and writer, was born into a Mohegan community near New London, Connecticut, the son of Joshua Occom and Sarah (maiden name unknown).

At seventeen Samson Occom was converted to Christianity by Rev. James Davenport during the “Great Awakening” (c. 1730–1740), when efforts to bring the gospel to New England Indians were rekindled by evangelists. In 1743 he enrolled in ...

Article

Vane, Sir Henry (1613–14 June 1662), Puritan political figure, was born at Debden, Essex, England, the son of Sir Henry Vane, a knight and the comptroller and treasurer of the English royal household, and Frances Darcy. He attended Westminster School and entered Magdalen Hall, Oxford. By the age of fifteen, however, he had become a Puritan; he left Oxford and matriculated at Leyden, on the Continent. When he first brought up the idea of immigrating to New England, his father strongly objected, but the king himself intervened on his behalf....

Article

Williams, Roger (1603?–1683), clergyman and founder of Rhode Island, was born in London, England, the son of James Williams, a merchant, and Alice Pemberton. His precise birth date is unknown, and his own references to his age throughout his lifetime are contradictory. During his teens, Williams experienced a spiritual awakening that moved him to join the ranks of Puritan dissenters who were voicing opposition to the ecclesiastical policies of the Church of England and King James I; his religious fervor, however, caused a falling out with his father, a stalwart supporter of the Anglican church....