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Arnold, Eve (21 April 1912–04 January 2012), photojournalist, was born Eve Cohen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the seventh of nine children of the Ukrainian Jewish immigrants Vevel (William) Sklarski, a rabbi, and Bosya (Bessie) Laschiner. Although Eve’s parents were poor she received a good basic education. Eve first considered a career as a writer or a dancer, then settled on medicine, but she gave this up to move to New York City. During World War II she got a job at America’s first automated photographic film processing plant in Hoboken, New Jersey, although she knew little about photography then. It was only in 1946 when her then boyfriend gave her a forty-dollar Rolleicord camera that she took up photography as a hobby. The boyfriend did not last long, but her love of photography grew into a highly successful and fulfilling career....

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Chapelle, Dickey (14 March 1918–04 November 1965), foreign correspondent and photojournalist, was born Georgette Louise Marie Meyer in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the daughter of Paul Gerhard Meyer, a building materials salesman, and Edna F. Engelhardt. “Dickey” became her nickname as a young girl. In 1935 she graduated valedictorian at the age of seventeen from Shorewood (Wis.) High School and won a full scholarship to study aeronautical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Writing news stories for the ...

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Eisenstaedt, Alfred (06 December 1898–23 August 1995), photographer and photojournalist, was born in Dirschau, West Prussia, a former German territory (today Tczew, Poland), the son of Joseph Eisenstaedt, a wealthy department store owner, and Regina Schoen. Little is known of Eisenstaedt’s early youth, but the family moved from Dirschau to Berlin-Wilmersdorf in 1906. Eisenstaedt attended the local Hohenzollern Gymnasium. At the age of fourteen he received his first camera, an Eastman Folding Pocket Kodak, which was given to him as a birthday present by his uncle. While still a student Eisenstaedt started taking pictures as a hobby....

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Hare, James Henry (03 October 1856–24 June 1946), photojournalist, was born in London, England, the son of George Hare, a camera manufacturer, and Margaret Ball. He attended St. John’s College in London but left school in 1871 to apprentice with his father for the next eight years. He left his father’s firm in 1879 and joined another London camera-making company. Hare married Ellen Crapper on 2 August 1879; they had five children....

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Rosenthal, Joe (09 October 1911–20 August 2006), photojournalist, was born Joseph John Rosenthal in Washington, D.C., one of five sons of David and Lena Rosenthal. His parents were Jewish immigrants from Russia, but young Joe converted to Catholicism. Joe experimented with photography from an early age. He obtained an Eastman Kodak Brownie camera by clipping and mailing in coupons. Joe attended McKinley Technical High School in Washington, D.C. He was so small the football coaches refused to let him try out for the team: instead Joe tried out for track and became a champion pole-vaulter....

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Rothstein, Arthur (17 July 1915–11 November 1985), photojournalist, was born in Harlem in New York City, the son of Isidore Rothstein, a merchant, and Nettie Perlstein. Around 1920 the family moved to Edenwald in the North Bronx, where Rothstein received his first camera, built a darkroom, and experimented with crystal radio. He qualified for Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan and then graduated in science from Columbia University in 1935. He was a Kings Crown Scholar and hoped to attend medical school. At Columbia, Rothstein was a student assistant to ...

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Stryker, Roy Emerson (11 May 1893–26 September 1975), government official and documentarian, was born in Great Bend, Kansas, the son of George Stryker, a farmer and rancher, and Ellen (maiden name unknown). When Stryker was three, the family moved to Montrose, Colorado, where he spent his childhood. His father was an ardent Populist who believed in the value of higher learning. After graduating from high school in 1912, Stryker attended the Colorado School of Mines for a few terms, worked on a cattle ranch for several years with an elder brother, and served in the infantry in France during World War I, although he did not see combat. In September 1921, after some further study at the Colorado School of Mines, he married Alice Frasier and moved to New York to study at Columbia University. They had one daughter, Phyllis....