1-20 of 22 results  for:

  • tennis player x
  • Sports, games, and pastimes x
Clear all

Article

Ashe, Arthur (10 July 1943–06 February 1993), tennis player, author, and political activist, was born Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr., in Richmond, Virginia, the son of Arthur Ashe, Sr., a police officer, and Mattie Cunningham. Tall and slim as a young boy, Ashe was forbidden by his father from playing football; he took up tennis instead on the segregated playground courts at Brookfield Park, near his home. By the time he was ten he came under the tutelage of a local tennis fan and physician from Lynchburg, Walter Johnson. Johnson had previously nurtured Althea Gibson, who would become the first African American to win Wimbeldon, in 1957 and 1958, and his second protégé would prove no less successful....

Article

Budge, Don (13 June 1915–26 January 2000), tennis player, was born John Donald Budge in Oakland, California, the son of John “Jack” Budge, a Scottish ex-professional soccer player who managed a laundry in Oakland, and Pearl Kincaid Budge. Don's older brother Lloyd, later a tennis instructor, taught him the rudiments of the game, but the preteenager preferred baseball, football, and basketball. Although he was only five feet six inches tall, at University High School in Oakland he became a forward on the varsity basketball team....

Article

Campbell, Oliver Samuel (25 February 1871–11 July 1953), tennis player, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Frederick Hudson Campbell, a dry goods merchant who died in 1872, and Emily Barber. “Ollie” was raised amidst affluence in Brooklyn. He began playing lawn tennis at age twelve and entered his first public tournaments shortly before his fifteenth birthday. Despite his youth, he performed well in adult competition. When he lost to the experienced Harry Slocum, after winning one set, in the first round of the U.S. championship at the Newport (R.I.) Casino, Campbell became the youngest to play in national mens singles until ...

Image

Dwight Davis Left, at the swearing-in of the new secretary of war, James Good, right, 1929. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-96839).

Article

Davis, Dwight Filley (05 July 1879–28 November 1945), tennis player and U.S. secretary of war, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of John Tilden Davis, a dry goods merchant and banker, and Maria Jeanette Filley. The family’s financial success and public-mindedness made it a leader on the St. Louis business, education, and social scenes. Following preparatory school at Smith Academy in St. Louis, Davis attended Harvard University, earning a Bachelor of Arts in 1900. While in college, he gained national prominence as a singles and doubles tennis player. In his junior and senior years he was the runner-up in the U.S. men’s singles championship, and in those same two years and the year after he and his partner, ...

Article

Dwight, James (14 July 1852–13 July 1917), tennis player, author, and administrator, was born in Paris, France, the son of Thomas Dwight, a lawyer, and Mary Collins Warren. Both parents were of elite Boston, Massachusetts, families. The Dwights returned to Boston when James was two years old so that his brother Thomas could prepare for college. James grew up on Beacon Street, attending Epes Sargent Dixwell’s school and graduating with a B.A. from Harvard College in 1874. At Harvard he played on class football teams for four years and captained a cricket team. Following his brother Thomas’s example and a Warren family tradition, Dwight entered Harvard Medical School. He was hampered by illnesses and did not receive his M.D. until 1879. During his internship at Boston Lying-In Hospital he suffered rheumatic fever and quit the practice of medicine. Throughout his life, however, he was addressed as “Doctor.”...

Article

Gonzalez, Pancho (09 May 1928–03 July 1995), tennis player, was born Richard Alonzo Gonzalez in Los Angeles, California, the son of Manuel Gonzalez, a painter of houses and Hollywood movie sets, and Carmen Alire, a seamstress. Gonzalez’s parents, who emigrated from Chihuahua, Mexico, and settled in a poor section of Los Angeles, were determined to give their seven children a decent childhood in the dangerous barrios of South Los Angeles. After a boyhood accident on a scooter that left Gonzalez with a scar on his cheek several inches long, his parents refused to give the twelve-year-old the bicycle that he wanted. Instead, his mother bought him a 51-cent tennis racket. The restless, energetic Gonzalez quickly discovered his natural athletic ability and became obsessed with the game of tennis, which he learned in the public courts of Exposition Park near the Los Angeles Coliseum....

Article

Johnston, William M. (02 November 1894–01 May 1946), tennis player, was born in San Francisco, California, the son of Robert Johnston, an electric plant mechanic, and Margaret Burns. Johnston disliked his French-sounding middle name and never revealed it publicly. He played tennis first in 1905; when schools remained shut for several months following the San Francisco earthquake of 1906, he played constantly. For the next few years Johnston, Johnny Strachan, Roland Roberts, Ely Fottrell, Clarence “Peck” Griffin, and other talented juniors improved their tennis skills and were coached by nationally famous players ...

Article

Larned, William Augustus (30 December 1872–16 December 1926), tennis player, was born in Summit, New Jersey, the son of William Zebedee Larned, a wealthy Summit landowner and New York lawyer, and Katharine Penniman. Although he did not graduate from Cornell University, while a student he won the 1892 intercollegiate tennis singles championship....

Article

McLoughlin, Maurice Evans (07 January 1890–10 December 1957), tennis player, was born in Carson City, Nevada, the son of George McLoughlin, an employee and later superintendent of machinery in U.S. mints, and Harriet Verrill. He developed an attacking “big game” style of play on San Francisco’s asphalt courts that led to his winning the Junior Parks Championship in 1906. McLoughlin captured the Pacific Coast and San Francisco championships in 1907 and the 1909 National Interscholastic Tournament. After graduating from Lowell High School in San Francisco in 1909, he was accepted into the University of California but decided to pursue a tennis career instead....

Article

Paret, Jahail Parmly (03 October 1870–24 November 1952), tennis player, journalist, and author, was born in Bergen Point, New Jersey, the son of Henry Paret, a wealthy clothing merchant, and Anna Elizabeth Parmly, later the editor of Harper’s Handy Book for Girls (1910). Named for his maternal grandfather, Paret so disliked his first name that he constantly reduced it to a first initial and preferred to be called by his middle name. He graduated in 1886 from Grammar School 68 in New York City....

Article

Richards, Vincent (20 March 1903–28 September 1959), tennis player, was born in New York City, the son of Edward A. Richards, a building contractor, and Mary Frances McQuade. His family moved to South Yonkers, New York, while he was still small, and his father died when he was eight years old. Given a battered tennis racket, he hit a rubber ball against a brick wall interminably until he acquired pinpoint accuracy. By retrieving strayed tennis balls he gained entrance into nearby Lowerre Tennis Club and soon defeated the club champion. In 1915 Richards won the Yonkers junior championship, and one year later he became the runner-up in a boy’s tourney at Sleepy Hollow (New York) Country Club after noted tennis player Fred B. Alexander sponsored his entry. Richards won numerous younger-age United States championships, including boys’ singles in 1917 and 1918; junior singles in 1919, 1920, and 1921; and junior doubles with Harold Taylor in 1918. After graduating in 1919 from Fordham Preparatory School, Richards attended Fordham University two years, and, in 1922, studied a year at Columbia University School of Journalism. During this time Richards held various jobs: as a chalk boy on Wall Street; as a salesman and racket stringer at Alex Taylor’s sporting goods store in New York City; as an assistant sports editor for the ...

Article

Riggs, Bobby (25 February 1918–25 October 1995), tennis player, was born Robert Larimore Riggs in Los Angeles, California, the son of Gideon Wright Riggs, a minister of the Church of Christ, and Agnes Jones Riggs. During his childhood, Riggs's older brothers pushed him into various sports competitions. He began playing tennis at age twelve. Esther Bartosh, a leading local tournament player and an anatomy instructor at the University of Southern California, impressed by Riggs's potential, taught him stroke mechanics and guided him through boys' tournaments, most of which he won. Before he graduated from Franklin High School in 1935, Riggs captured the California Interscholastic singles title in three consecutive years. Earlier he reached the semifinal round of the 1932 U.S. Boys (under age fifteen) championship and ranked third nationally in that classification. In 1933 he won his first national title, the U.S. Junior (under age eighteen) doubles, with Bob Harman. In 1934 Riggs lost the U.S. Junior singles final to the New Englander Gilbert Hunt, but in 1935 he defeated Gil Hunt in the final and secured the doubles crown with his fellow Californian Joe Hunt....

Article

Sears, Dick (26 October 1861–08 April 1943), tennis player, was born Richard Dudley Sears in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Frederick Richard Sears, a trustee of the Sears family estate, and Albertina Homer Shelton. His grandfather, David Sears, amassed a fortune in shipping and real estate, permitting Sears to be raised in an elite wealthy family in Boston’s exclusive Beacon Hill neighborhood. He attended J. P. Hopkinson’s private school, and in 1879 he entered Harvard College....

Article

Talbert, Billy (04 September 1918–28 February 1999), tennis player, was born William Franklin Talbert in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Rezin C. Talbert, operator of a livestock business and a former minor league baseball pitcher, and Clara Talbert. As a child, Talbert enjoyed sports, especially baseball. His hope of becoming a big league player was shattered at age ten when he contracted diabetes and faced a lifetime of insulin injections, diet restrictions, and limited exercise. In 1932, when Talbert was fourteen, his physician, noting the youngster's extreme unhappiness with his inactivity, recommended that he play tennis, a sport he had rejected earlier as a sissy's game....

Image

Bill Tilden. Gelatin silver print, c. 1930, by Underwood & Underwood. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Lawrence A. Fleischman and Howard Garfinkle with a matching grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Article

Tilden, Bill (10 February 1893–05 June 1953), tennis player, was born William Tatem Tilden, Jr., at “Overleigh,” his parents’ mansion in the Germantown section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of William Tatem Tilden, a wool merchant and local reform political leader, and Selina Hey, an accomplished pianist. He was tutored at home because his mother overprotected him against communicable diseases. At age seven Tilden discovered tennis at the Onteora (N.Y.) Club, in the Catskill Mountains, where the family summered. Thereafter, “Junior” played tennis mostly at the Germantown Cricket Club, where the Tildens held membership. He closely copied the serve-and-volley style of his teenage brother, Herbert Marmaduke Tilden, a skilled tournament competitor. When his mother contracted Bright’s disease in 1908, Tilden was sent to live nearby with his aunt, Mary Elizabeth Hey, and his first cousin, Selena Hey. He would reside there for the next thirty years. His aunt enrolled him at Germantown Academy, where he played on the tennis team for two years, his senior year as team captain. In 1910 he graduated from the academy, preparatory to entering the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania....

Article

Ward, Holcombe (23 November 1878–23 January 1967), tennis player and administrator, was born in New York City, the son of Robert Ward, a woolen goods manufacturer, and Mary Elizabeth Snedekor. During his youth, Ward lived in South Orange, New Jersey, where he joined the Orange Lawn Tennis and Cricket Club and there won his first tournament. He graduated in 1896 from St. Mark’s School, Southboro, Massachusetts, and in 1900 from Harvard University....

Article

Whitman, Malcolm Douglass (05 March 1877–28 December 1932), tennis player, was born in Andover, Massachusetts, the son of William Whitman, a wealthy textile mill owner, and Jane Dole Hallett. As a youth, Mac Whitman played tennis regularly at the Longwood Cricket Club in Boston. He was educated at Roxbury Latin School and Hopkinson’s School in Boston, and he graduated from Harvard University in 1899 with a B.A., cum laude, and from Harvard Law School in 1902....

Article

Williams, Dick (29 January 1891–02 June 1968), tennis player, was born Richard Norris Williams II in Geneva, Switzerland, the son of Charles Duane Williams, a lawyer, and Lydia Biddle White. His parents, who came from wealthy, elite families of Philadelphia, settled in Switzerland but retained U.S. citizenship. Richard was educated by tutors and frequently accompanied his parents to other European countries and to the United States. He began playing lawn tennis in 1903. Self-taught, he quickly mastered grips, strokes, and tactics, and he first competed in Swiss championships in 1905. During the next half-decade he learned to take groundstrokes on the rise and to volley expertly. He was soon able to cope with first-class players on various court surfaces such as the dirt surface of courts in Switzerland, the clay of the French Riviera, the wood of indoor courts in Paris, the cement of California, and the grass of the eastern United States. Constantly encouraged by his father, he improved markedly every year. He won the 1911 Swiss and French indoor championships and defeated the great European star William Laurentz in the latter....