1-20 of 44 results  for:

  • Sports, games, and pastimes x
Clear all

Article

Allen, Phog (18 November 1885–16 September 1974), basketball coach, was born Forrest Clare Allen in Jamesport, Missouri, the son of William Perry Allen, a traveling salesman, and Alexine Perry. At an early age, Allen moved with his family to Independence, Missouri, where he grew up on the same block as future president ...

Image

Red Auerbach. Gelatin silver print, 1957, by David Marlin. (Auerbach, left, talks with the Celtics' All-Star point guard Bob Cousy.) National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Article

Auerbach, Red (20 September 1917–28 October 2006), basketball coach, was born Arnold Jacob Aurbach in Brooklyn, New York, to Hyman Auerbach and Marie Thompson Auerbach. Hyman was a Jew from Minsk, who fled anti-Semitism in Belarus at the age of 13, arriving in New York with two brothers. Marie was a cashier in a restaurant where Hyman worked....

Article

Bee, Clair Francis (02 March 1896–20 May 1983), basketball coach and writer, was born near Clarksburg, West Virginia. His parents’ names and occupations are unknown. Before he was six, he suffered from tuberculosis, and a doctor advised that he spend a great deal of time outdoors. “That prescription,” Bee later said, “helped to push me into sports.” Bee and his friends often would sneak into a church gymnasium to play basketball. When he was six, his mother died of tuberculosis, after which Bee spent part of his boyhood on his uncle’s farm in Belleville, Kansas, part in Parkersburg and Grafton, West Virginia, and the rest at Massanutten Military Academy, Woodstock, Virginia. As a sophomore at Grafton High School in 1915, he wrote what may have been one of the first short stories on basketball, “Bud’s Loyalty.” In 1917 he graduated from high school....

Article

Blood, Ernest Artel (04 October 1872–05 February 1955), athlete and basketball coach, nicknamed "Prof", athlete and basketball coach, nicknamed “Prof,” was born in Manchester, New Hampshire, the son of farmers. Blood spent most of his youth in New Hampshire and Massachusetts but did not attend college. An all-around athlete, he excelled in basketball, football, baseball, fencing, gymnastics, and tumbling. Short of stature but muscularly developed, he could throw a sixteen-pound shot put into the air and then catch it on the nape of his neck....

Article

Brown, Walter A. (10 February 1905–07 September 1964), sports promoter and coach, was born in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, the son of George Victory Brown, a sports promoter and athletic director at Boston University, and Elizabeth Gallagher. Brown attended Boston Latin School and graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1926. After brief stints in the business world and an apprenticeship under his father, who was general manager of Boston Arena and president of Boston Garden, Brown turned to coaching amateur hockey. From 1931 to 1936 he toured Europe with a team of handpicked players, making history in 1933 when the team defeated Toronto 2–1 in Prague for the world’s amateur title—the first non-Canadian team to win the championship. In 1932 he founded the Boston Olympics hockey team of the Amateur Hockey Association of America; he coached the team for four years before moving to the front office in 1936. During the next decade the Olympics won five U.S. national titles....

Article

Carlson, Henry Clifford (04 July 1894–01 November 1964), college basketball coach and physician, was born in Pitsburg, Ohio, a mere crossroad in the west-central part of the state, the son of Harold Carlson and Martha (maiden name unknown). When he was two his family moved to Murray City, Ohio, where his father went to work in the coal mines. Tragedy and near poverty plagued the family. When Henry was five his father died in a mining accident. His mother remarried, and the family moved to Fayette City, Pennsylvania, where his stepfather also lost his life in the mines. Unlike many of his friends, Carlson completed high school, graduating in 1912. Unable to afford college, he enrolled in the Bellefonte Academy in Fayette, Pennsylvania. At Bellefonte the young redhead pursued a college preparatory curriculum for two years and excelled in three sports before entering the University of Pittsburgh on an athletic scholarship in 1914....

Article

Case, Everett Norris (21 June 1900–30 April 1966), basketball coach, was born in Anderson, Indiana, the son of Samuel H. Case and Emma Norris. Case played tennis at Anderson High School, but, surprisingly, he did not play basketball, either in high school or in college....

Image

Wilt Chamberlain. In a Harlem Globetrotters uniform. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-115428).

Article

Chamberlain, Wilt (21 August 1936–12 October 1999), basketball player, was born Wilton Norman Chamberlain in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of William Chamberlain, a welder and handyman, and Olivia Ruth Chamberlain, a domestic maid and cook. Although his father was only five feet eight inches and his mother five feet nine inches, by age ten Chamberlain was already six feet tall, and he stood six feet three when he graduated from elementary school. His astonishing growth continued through adolescence and he reached a full seven feet by his fourteenth birthday, according to Chamberlain himself. In addition to his extraordinary height, Chamberlain was a natural athlete with fierce competitive instincts. He was a fast runner and was selected to participate in the 1946 Penn Relays when he was just ten years old. His youthful ambition was to be an Olympian. In high school he was undefeated in the shot put; he ran the hundred-yard dash in 9.3 seconds; and he recorded a vertical leap of fifty inches. Later in life Chamberlain boasted that he was perfect for the decathlon and could have been known officially as the world's greatest athlete....

Article

Cooper, Tarzan (30 August 1907–19 December 1980), professional basketball player, was born Charles Theodore in Newark, Delaware, the son of Theodore Cooper and Evelyn (maiden name unknown), occupations unknown. Tarzan, later nicknamed “Tatie” by the press, was a standout for the Central High School basketball team in Philadelphia, where he graduated in 1925. He immediately began a twenty-year career in professional basketball, playing initially with the Philadelphia Panther Pros in 1925, then going on to star for the all-black Philadelphia Giants from 1926 to 1929. ...

Image

Dave DeBusschere. Eluding the Baltimore Bullets' Wesley Unseld, New York City, 30 December 1972. Courtesy of AP Images.

Article

DeBusschere, Dave (16 October 1940–14 May 2003), basketball player and coach, was born David Albert DeBusschere in Detroit, Michigan. Little is recorded about DeBusschere's early life, but what is known is that his basketball career began when he was a star for Austin Catholic High School in Detroit. Basketball, however, was not the only sport in which DeBusschere excelled. He was the star pitcher on an Austin baseball team that won the city championship, and he was also a pitcher on a local team that won the national junior championship. Meanwhile, he led his high school team to the state basketball title....

Article

Dehnert, Dutch (05 April 1898–20 April 1979), professional basketball player and coach, was born Henry Dehnert in New York City. Dehnert grew up on the streets of Manhattan’s West Side and attended public schools. He did not play high school basketball, however, and he never enrolled in college. Instead, around 1918 he began playing professional basketball with successful brief stints in the New York State League, Pennsylvania State League, and the New England League before joining the Original Celtics in 1919. The first Celtic team played from 1914 through 1917, but it did not emerge as the most celebrated of its time until the years from 1919 until 1922, when the team was joined by Dehnert, Johnny Beckman, Horse Haggarty, Joe Trippe, Pete Barry, Nat Holman (the only player with collegiate experience), Chris Leonard, ...

Article

Diddle, Edgar Allen, Sr. (12 March 1895–02 January 1970), college basketball coach and administrator, was born in Gradyville, Kentucky, the son of John Haskins Diddle, a tobacco farmer, and Mary Elizabeth Hughes. Gradyville was little more than a general store, post office, a few houses, and a one-room schoolhouse for elementary grades. Between his chores and school Diddle played sandlot baseball and sharpened his basketball skills on outdoor, dirt courts. By the time he entered Columbia High School he excelled in both sports....

Article

Douglas, Robert L. (04 November 1882–16 July 1979), professional basketball player and team owner, was born in St. Kitts, British West Indies. No information is available concerning Douglas’s parents or his early education. He observed his first basketball game shortly after arriving in New York City in 1902. Approximately 1919 Douglas and some friends organized the Spartan Field Club, which provided black New York City youths with opportunities to participate in cricket, soccer, track, and basketball at the amateur level. Coach Douglas’s basketball team, the Spartan Braves, were very successful, and at times he joined them on the court....

Article

Edmundson, Hec (03 August 1886–06 August 1964), college basketball and track coach, was born Clarence Sinclair Edmundson in Moscow, Idaho, the son of Thomas Sinclair Edmundson and Emma Jeannette Rowley. He acquired an unusual nickname as a boy. Running along dirt roads in the Palouse region of western Idaho, he was frequently heard to utter “Aw, heck!” in self-criticism of his training efforts. Thus Clarence became Hec, the name by which he was known throughout his life....

Article

Fulks, Joseph (26 October 1921–21 March 1976), professional basketball player, was born in Birmingham, Kentucky, the son of Leonard Fulks and Mattie Estes, farmers. Later Leonard Fulks served as a prison guard. When a dam was built, covering the area with water, the family moved to Kuttawa, Kentucky. Joseph Fulks attended school in Marshall County and Kuttawa, where he gained recognition for his basketball abilities. In 1941 he went on to nearby Murray State Teachers College. At 6′ 5″ and 190 pounds he averaged more than 13 points per game, winning selection to conference all-star teams after his freshman and sophomore seasons. The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) named him to its 1943 All-America team. That year he married Mary Sue Gillespie; they had four children....

Article

Gottlieb, Eddie (15 September 1898–07 December 1979), professional basketball coach, promoter, and team owner, was born Edward Gottlieb in Kiev, Ukraine, the son of Morris Gottlieb and Leah (maiden name unknown). Gottlieb’s family moved to the United States in 1907. While growing up in a Jewish section of Philadelphia, he learned basketball, and in 1918 he organized and promoted a team that represented the South Philadelphia Hebrew Association (Sphas). The Sphas soon ended their affiliation with the association but kept a six-pointed star and the Hebrew letters ...

Article

Hickey, Edgar Sylvester (20 December 1902–05 December 1980), college basketball coach, was born on a farm near Reynolds in Thayer County, Nebraska, the son of Christopher Hickey, a real estate broker, and Fern (maiden name unknown). He played four sports in high school and captained the football, basketball, and baseball teams. At Creighton University in Omaha, he played two years of basketball and four years of varsity football before graduating cum laude with a law degree in 1926. In 1924 Hickey had married Hariette Pinkerton of Omaha. They had two sons....