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Allen, Young John William (03 January 1836–30 May 1907), missionary, educator, and journalist in China, was born in Burke County, Georgia, the son of Andrew Young John Allen and Jane Wooten. Because of the early death of both parents, Allen was raised by an aunt and uncle, Wiley and Nancy (Wooten) Hutchins, who lived in Meriwether County, Georgia. He received a sizable inheritance from his father, which financed his education at several small private schools near his home in Starrsville, Georgia, including the Baptist-run Brownwood Institute in LaGrange, Georgia, and the Morgan H. Looney schools in Palmetto, Georgia. His inheritance also allowed him to collect a personal library, which made him the envy of his classmates as early as 1850, when he was only fourteen years old. He began college work at Emory and Henry College in Virginia in 1853 but transferred to Emory College in Oxford, Georgia, in the spring of 1854. At Emory, Allen acquired the secular learning of the European tradition as well as knowledge of Christianity. His extracurricular activities included membership in a debating society and religious study groups, both of which prepared him for his subsequent careers in China....

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Capers, William (26 January 1790–29 January 1855), Methodist bishop, editor, and missionary, was born at Bull-Head Swamp plantation in St. Thomas Parish, South Carolina, the son of William Capers, a planter and former revolutionary war officer, and Mary Singeltary. William was only two years old when his mother died, and he was reared primarily by his stepmother, Mary Wragg. After being tutored at home, he attended schools in Georgetown, South Carolina, and in the High Hills, Santee. At age sixteen he entered South Carolina College, but he found his preparation in classical studies inadequate. After dropping out to study law with John S. Richardson of Stateburg, South Carolina, Capers soon abandoned that career for the ministry in the Methodist Episcopal (ME) church....

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Evans, Nathaniel (08 June 1742–29 October 1767), poet and Church of England missionary, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Edward Evans, a merchant, and his wife, whose name is unknown. Intended by his parents for a career as a merchant, Evans entered the new Academy of Philadelphia soon after its opening in 1751. There he came under the influence of its energetic and visionary provost, the Reverend ...

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Flint, Timothy (11 July 1780–16 August 1840), pastor, missionary, and author, was born in North Reading, Massachusetts, the son of William Flint and Martha Kimball, farmers. Flint attended the North Reading Grammar School and Phillips Academy at Andover before entering Harvard, from which he graduated in 1800. Later he studied theology and, remaining in Massachusetts, he taught at Cohasset and preached at Marblehead, where he married Abigail Hubbard in 1802. He was ordained in 1802 as the pastor of the Congregational church at Lunenberg, at a salary of $400 per annum. He soon had disagreements with several parishioners. One townsman even accused him of counterfeiting. Flint, who was merely fond of conducting harmless chemical experiments, sued and was awarded damages. More serious matters were his laxity in Calvinist dogma and his being a Federalist in a Democratic parish. Becoming tactlessly unorthodox and evangelical, he requested and was granted his dismissal from the church in 1814....

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Henni, John Martin (15 June 1805–07 September 1881), editor and Catholic missionary, was born in Misanenga, Switzerland, the son of Johann George Henni and Maria Ursula Henni, farmers. He was educated at the Gymnasium of St. Gall, Switzerland, the Lyceum and Gymnasium of Lucerne, and the Urban College of the Propaganda in Rome. While a student in Rome he met Father Frederick Résé, a co-worker of Bishop ...

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Price, Thomas Frederick (19 August 1860–12 September 1919), Roman Catholic priest, editor, and missionary, was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, the son of Alfred Lanier Price, an editor and publisher, and Clarissa Bond. Alfred Price, editor of the Wilmington Daily Journal (1848–1872), converted from Episcopalianism to Roman Catholicism in 1866. Clarissa, at the price of ostracism from her family, had converted from Methodism to Roman Catholicism before her marriage....

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Rogers, Elymas Payson (10 February 1815–20 January 1861), clergyman, poet, and missionary, was born in Madison, Connecticut, the son of Abel Rogers and Chloe Ladue, farmers. His father, the son of an African slave who had survived a shipwreck off the coast of Connecticut, was raised as family by the Reverend Jonathan Todd, from whom he eventually inherited the farmland on which he made his living. In the early 1830s, Rogers left for Hartford, Connecticut, where he attended school and worked for his board in the home of a Major Caldwell. His first formal church affiliation was established in 1833 as a communicant of the Hartford Talcott Street congregation....

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Seagrave, Gordon Stifler (18 March 1897–28 March 1965), physician, missionary, and writer, was born in Rangoon, Burma, the son of Albert Ernest Seagrave, a Baptist missionary, and Alice Haswell Vinton. After spending his early childhood in Burma, young Seagrave came to the United States at the age of twelve with his mother and three older sisters to attend preparatory school in Granville, Ohio. In 1914 he entered Denison University in Granville and three years later received an undergraduate degree in biology. Seagrave went on to the Johns Hopkins University Medical School, interrupting his education to serve in Europe with a medical unit from Hopkins during World War I....