1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • Christian: other x
  • Writing and publishing x
Clear all

Article

Hale, John (03 June 1636–15 May 1700), Congregational minister, author, and participant in the Salem witch trials, was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, to Robert Hale and Joanna Cutter. Robert Hale emigrated from England and became a selectman and a deacon in the church at Charlestown. Little is known of John Hale’s early life. He attended Harvard, graduating in 1657. Hale was called to the ministry in Beverly, Massachusetts, in 1667, having served as a teacher in the church there for a few years before the town formally separated from Salem in 1668. As minister, Hale received a house, land, firewood, and a salary of seventy pounds per year....

Article

Smith, Elias (17 June 1769–29 June 1846), minister, religious journalist and polemicist, and botanical doctor, was born in Lyme, Connecticut, the son of Stephen Smith and Irene Ransom. Like many New England farm families in search of adequate land during this period, Stephen Smith and his family moved in 1782 to the Vermont frontier near Woodstock. As formal schooling was a luxury that few could afford, the adolescent Elias received an education largely through a course of self-study with the assistance of his uncle Elisha Ransom, a Baptist preacher in Woodstock. Smith began teaching in a local school at the age of nineteen, but he was preoccupied by spiritual matters that had begun with a vision of God followed by conversion in 1785. Smith was especially perplexed about baptism, which had been a point of contention in the family because his father was a Separate Baptist and his mother a Separate Congregationalist. He finally decided in 1789 to be baptized and join the Baptist church in Woodstock....

Article

Taylor, Edward (1642?–24 June 1729), poet and minister, was born in Sketchley, Leicestershire, England, the son of William Taylor, a farmer. His mother’s name is unknown. Born into a family of religious dissenters, Taylor taught school in Bagworth until he lost his post for refusing to subscribe to the 1662 Act of Uniformity. A fervent opponent of the Restoration and the Anglican church, he immigrated to New England in 1668 and enrolled at Harvard, where he was given the position of college butler in recognition of his advanced age and experience. A distinguished scholar, he was one of four students selected to offer declamations at his graduation in 1671. Although Taylor planned to stay on as a tutor, a delegation from Westfield, a village in the Connecticut Valley, asked him to be their minister. He soon left for Westfield but did not formally organize the church there until 1679, perhaps because of threats arising from Indian wars in the area and because he may have questioned whether his scholarly temperament suited him for ministering to a frontier village. In 1674 he married Elizabeth Fitch, daughter of the Reverend James Fitch of Norwich. She died in 1689, leaving him with their three surviving children. Three years later he married Ruth Wyllis; they had six children....

Article

Wigglesworth, Edward (1693–16 January 1765), educator and theologian, was born in Malden, Massachusetts, the son of Michael Wigglesworth, a minister, physician, and Puritan poet, and Sybil Avery Sparhawk or Sparrowhawk. His father, a Harvard graduate, was known principally for his popular, catechistic poem “The Day of Doom” (1662). Edward Wigglesworth received early training at the Boston Latin School, then matriculated to Harvard College, where he graduated in 1710. Between 1710 and 1720 he preached in a number of churches throughout the Massachusetts Bay Colony and worked briefly for both the school at Casco Bay Fort and the Boston Latin School....

Article

Wigglesworth, Michael (18 October 1631–10 June 1705), Puritan minister and poet, was born in Yorkshire, England, the son of Edward Wigglesworth, a tradesman, and Esther (or Hester, maiden name unknown). In 1638 the Wigglesworths left Yorkshire and persecution for religion for Charlestown, New England, and subsequently for New Haven, where the family spent the winter in a basement and where Michael became ill. Physical debility remained and affected the minister-poet throughout his life. Wigglesworth was sent to Ezekiel Cheever for his formal education at the age of eight, but he returned after two years to assist his injured father on the farm. Proving himself unfit for husbandry, Wigglesworth was returned to Cheever in 1644, who prepared him to enter Harvard three years later. Initially preparing to pursue medicine, he experienced conversion after three and one half years at Harvard and decided to enter the ministry instead, remaining at Harvard as a tutor and fellow until 1654, at which time he was offered the pulpit in Malden, Massachusetts....