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Brady, Cyrus Townsend (20 December 1861–24 January 1920), Episcopal clergyman and author, was born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, the son of Jasper Ewing Brady, Jr., a banker and accountant, and Harriet Cora Townsend. He grew up in Leavenworth, Kansas, and graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1883. Brady married Clarissa Sidney Guthrie in 1884; they had three children. After three years of naval service, he became a railroad worker for the Missouri Pacific and Union Pacific railroads. Under the influence of Bishop Worthington of Nebraska, he abandoned his native Presbyterianism and began to read for the Episcopal ministry in whatever hours he could snatch from his regular employment. He was ordained deacon in 1889 and priest in 1890, working mostly as an itinerant missionary in five western states. Brady estimated that in just three years he logged more than 90,000 miles “preaching or delivering addresses … marrying, baptizing, and doing all the other endless work of an itinerant missionary” ( ...

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Crapsey, Algernon Sidney (28 June 1847–31 December 1927), religious leader, was born in Fairmount, Ohio, the son of Jacob Tompkins Crapsey, a lawyer, and Rachel Morris. His father’s declining legal practice forced Crapsey at age eleven to seek employment in a dry goods store. During the Civil War he served for four months as a private in the Ohio Infantry but was discharged when he was diagnosed as having a hypertrophied heart. He moved to New York City in the mid-1860s, became a bookkeeper, and joined the Episcopal church. Soon after he felt a call to ministry, studied at St. Stephen’s (later Bard) College from 1867 to 1869 and graduated from General Theological Seminary in 1872. He was ordained a priest of the Episcopal church in 1873 and served on the staff of Trinity Church in Manhattan. In 1875 he married Adelaide Trowbridge; they had nine children....

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Ewer, Ferdinand Cartwright (22 May 1826–10 October 1883), journalist and Anglo-Catholic clergyman, was born in Nantucket, Rhode Island, the son of Peter Folger Ewer, a shipowner and oil merchant, and his second wife, Mary Cartwright. During Ewer’s childhood, the family moved from Nantucket to Providence, Rhode Island, and then to New York City, finally returning to Nantucket in 1839. Throughout these years, the Ewers were financially well off, but the family fortune declined during Ewer’s years at Harvard (1845–1848). As a result, he experienced financial difficulties while in school and graduated in debt....

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Grant, Percy Stickney (13 May 1860–13 February 1927), Episcopal clergyman and poet, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Stephen Mason Grant and Annie Elizabeth Newhall Stickney. An 1883 graduate of Harvard University, he prepared for the ordained ministry at the Episcopal Theological School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, from which he received his B.D. in 1886. He earned an M.A. from Harvard in the same year. Ordained a deacon (1886) and priest (1887), he served three Massachusetts congregations (Church of the Ascension, Fall River, 1886; St. Mark’s, Fall River, 1887–1893; Christ Church, Swansea, 1890–1893) before becoming rector of the Church of the Ascension in New York City (1893–1924)....

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Henry, Caleb Sprague (02 August 1804–09 March 1884), educator, pastor, and author, was born in Rutland, Massachusetts, the son of Silas Henry and Dorothy Pierce. Henry received his A.B. from Dartmouth in 1825 and later studied at Andover Theological Seminary. At twenty-four years of age, Henry was ordained a pastor in the Congregational denomination and served at churches in Greenfield, Mississippi (1829–1831), and in West Hartford, Connecticut (1833–1835). Henry was a proponent of the peace movement and in 1834 wrote the pamphlet ...

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Holt, David Eldred (27 November 1843–05 November 1925), Confederate soldier, salesman, writer, and minister, was born on the family plantation at Athlone, Mississippi, the son of Dr. David Holt, physician, and Juliette White. The plantation was located between Natchez and Woodville, the Wilkinson County seat. In 1844 David's family moved to Natchez. There, Dr. Holt's medical practice thrived, and he built a new home called "Oddity Hall" due to its unique and unusual construction. Growing up in that house helped to forge the David's sense of devotion to family. Association with slaves and relatives, attendance of camp meetings and baptisms in the local river, and childhood pranks with friends all molded David's perceptions of life and religion. David was particularly close to his physician brother, Joseph Jackson Holt. His memoirs and correspondence later in life revealed the special bond and relationship the two shared....

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Ingraham, Joseph Holt (26 January 1809–18 December 1860), novelist and minister, was born in Portland, Maine, the son of James Milk Ingraham, a merchant, and Elizabeth Thurston. The second generation of a successful merchant and shipping family, the Ingrahams moved to Hallowell, Maine, in 1818. There Ingraham attended Hallowell Academy, studying languages and classics in preparation for college. His family’s status offered him many opportunities, and at least once, at age seventeen, he traveled to South America aboard one of his grandfather’s ships. In 1828 Ingraham entered Yale but remained for only one year before being dismissed for misconduct....

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Lowell, Robert Traill Spence (08 October 1816–12 September 1891), Episcopal priest, educator, and author, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of the Reverend Charles Lowell, a Unitarian minister, and Harriett Brackett Spence. He attended the Round Hill School, Northampton, Massachusetts, 1823–1828, where he studied with Joseph Green Cogswell, the founder of the school, and ...

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Pauli Murray Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-109644).

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Murray, Pauli (20 November 1910–01 July 1985), lawyer, writer, and minister, was born Anna Pauline Murray in Baltimore, Maryland, the daughter of William Henry Murray, a public school teacher, and Agnes Fitzgerald, a nurse. Triracial, she had African, European, and Native American ancestry. Her parents both died when she was a child (her mother had a cerebral hemorrhage in March 1914; her father was murdered in a state hospital in June 1923), and she grew up from age three in North Carolina with her maternal grandparents and her mother’s oldest sister, Pauline Fitzgerald Dame, a public school teacher who adopted her....

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Seabury, Samuel (09 June 1801–10 October 1872), Episcopal clergyman and journalist, was born in New London, Connecticut, the son of Charles Seabury, a cleric, and Anne Saltonstall. The family moved to Setauket, Long Island, in 1814. Seabury’s family, a long, established line of clerics, included a grandfather (and namesake) who was the first bishop of the Episcopal church in America. Charles Seabury, however, was a modest and uninspiring cleric, and his reduced economic circumstances markedly affected the education and early career of his son. Seabury’s early formal education was limited to various village schools, and rather than being permitted to study the classical languages as a preparation for college, he was instead apprenticed to a furniture maker in New York City. This was a traumatic experience for Seabury, a “bleeding of self-pride,” which he movingly recalled in his personal narrative written in 1831. His narrative includes descriptions of apprentice life and working-class religion and mores as seen through the eyes of a genteelly reared young man. His apprenticeship proved a failure, and he instead dedicated himself to the task of self-education, particularly in the classical languages. He received an honorary M.A. from Columbia College in 1826. Seabury was married three times: to Lydia Huntington Bill (1829–1834); to Hannah Amelia Jones (1835–1852); and to Mary Anna Jones (1854–1872). Altogether he had six children....

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Weems, Mason Locke (11 October 1759–23 May 1825), Episcopal priest, writer, and book agent, was born at “Marshes Seat,” near Herring Bay, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, the son of David Weems, occupation unknown, and Esther Hill. Very little is known about his early life, except what Bishop ...